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suggestions on what to do

mygalla shresha
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 20, 2009
Posts: 7
I have been in the field of Java programming since 2004. Though I have had lots of ups and down throughout my career, i am at a point where i know what i don't want to do but don't know what to do. I don't want to be a programmer in Java or for the matter in any language because, in spite of spending close to 8 years and now unemployed, i don't feel like attending any interviews or opening a book to learn the language. I am not sure whether it is that i lack the passion/interest or when i used to go and work, i felt hopeless as i lacked understanding of the subject and could not perform well compared to my peers. I have not taken time to research any other fields because my main intention is to go back to India after a couple of years and I am not sure what is that field which can provide me a bridge to jump across still retaining my sanity.I am really serious to make a mark on myself..to excel in it. I am not a fast learner but i take it slow and steady. I am not interested in testing or documentation or being at the management level.

Any suggestions please?


LoveToQuestion
Jayesh A Lalwani
Bartender

Joined: Jan 17, 2008
Posts: 2383
    
  28

Don't want to be programmer. Don't want to be tester. Don't want to be a manager. DOn't want to be a technical writer.

Have you thought about playing the lottery?

Seriously, maybe you want to teach?
mygalla shresha
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 20, 2009
Posts: 7
@Jayesh..Thanks for the response. No I am not interested in teaching either. I am more at the stage of discovering myself(so to speak) and would like suggestion on how to go about it. I do have taken several tests like Brinkman tests etc but except for superficial suggestions, i could not gather much from those tests. What i am actually looking for is how to discover what I am really passionate about? I can go on and on taking courses after courses but who would pay my bills!! I agree that their is no hard and fast rule but just need a direction and i can pick it up from there on!!

Thanks
Shreesha
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18874
    
  40

ilove toquestion wrote:I have been in the field of Java programming since 2004. Though I have had lots of ups and down throughout my career, i am at a point where i know what i don't want to do but don't know what to do. I don't want to be a programmer in Java or for the matter in any language because, in spite of spending close to 8 years and now unemployed, i don't feel like attending any interviews or opening a book to learn the language. I am not sure whether it is that i lack the passion/interest or when i used to go and work, i felt hopeless as i lacked understanding of the subject and could not perform well compared to my peers. I have not taken time to research any other fields because my main intention is to go back to India after a couple of years and I am not sure what is that field which can provide me a bridge to jump across still retaining my sanity.I am really serious to make a mark on myself..to excel in it. I am not a fast learner but i take it slow and steady. I am not interested in testing or documentation or being at the management level.


To be blunt, there really isn't any technology jobs that you can get without interviewing for -- even owners need to interview to get some sort of funding from VCs or banks.

Henry
Jayesh A Lalwani
Bartender

Joined: Jan 17, 2008
Posts: 2383
    
  28

At the risk of sounding like an armchair psychologist, I have to say your problem doesn't sound related to java. Perhaps a good therapist might be able to help you better.

What do you enjoy doing outside of work? A lot of people go through phases where they feel unfullfilled by work. It's completely normal. A lot of them find enjoyment in hobbies/family.
mygalla shresha
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 20, 2009
Posts: 7
After doing some self-analysis i have come up with the below concerns and would like help on how do i go about addressing them

1. Though i have been in this field for close to 8 years, I cannot think as fast as my peers and i do take time to analyse. I have a habit of writing down whenever i am given to analyze problems and that takes time. Isn't it a norm that in this industry they expect you to be fast and quick thinking?
2. I have a very very short listening/attention span and tend to get carried away because of which it has affected my work.
3. I get too much affected by my peers at work as they were lot smarter than me and good get the job done quickly but i used to take my own time.
4. I don't have the habit of going out and reading up on the latest trends in the field. I want to get motivated to do so but i am not able to convince/motivate myself to do that.
5. Whenever i am using a framework, my peers have the habit of going down to the source code level and trying to understand how it works, but for some reason i am not able to convince/motivate myself to do so!

Probably these are the concerns that is kind of making me run away from this field!


Thanks
Shresha



chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1726
    
  14

There's nothing wrong with writing stuff down (as I get older I do it all the time), or with taking your time to understand a problem. It may not even matter that your peers are quicker than you, provided your initial results are better than theirs e.g. do you get as many bugs in your code as they do? If your work passes testing first time, and they need 2 or 3 attempts before they pass the tests, then your "slow but sure" approach might work better. If you've been working in Java development for 8 years, you must be doing something right?

More generally, you sound very demotivated, which may be a sign you are in the wrong business, or may simply be a sign that you need to find a new area of IT to work in. There are lots of other things you can do in IT outside Java development, but you need to think about areas you might find interesting, and where you might be sufficiently motivated to learn the new things you'll need to know. You could look at other languages, other technologies (web development, databases, Big Data etc), or particular application areas you would like to know more about. If you're no longer interested in exploring the details of technology, you could look at moving into areas like business analysis instead, where your technical experience would be helpful, but you would be looking at things from a different perspective (and leaving other people to worry about the technical details!). Or think about things you like to do outside work, and see if you can turn those activities into a way to earn a living.

But whether you pick a new area to work in within the IT industry, or decide to do something completely different, you will still have to learn new things and work hard to develop your skills, and if you're starting a completely new kind of work then you might not earn much initially either. So you need to pick something that will motivate you enough to do this, and that's something only you can decide on.


No more Blub for me, thank you, Vicar.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61298
    
  66

I would see a physician to be evaluated for adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.


[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
mygalla shresha
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 20, 2009
Posts: 7
@Chris The Business Analyst idea sounds interesting to me but my question what does it involve and what are the growth prospects? I don't want to become stagnated in that field and would like your suggestion on what industries do i need to look into. I hope i am making some sense if not please let me know
chris webster
Bartender

Joined: Mar 01, 2009
Posts: 1726
    
  14

mygalla shresha wrote:@Chris The Business Analyst idea sounds interesting to me but my question what does it involve and what are the growth prospects? I don't want to become stagnated in that field and would like your suggestion on what industries do i need to look into. I hope i am making some sense if not please let me know

What does it involve? Here's a few Google hits to kick you off:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_analyst
http://www.iiba.org/IIBA/Professional_Development/What_is_Business_Analysis/IIBA_Website/Professional_Development/What_is_Business_Analysis/What_is_Business_Analysis.aspx
http://www.bridging-the-gap.com/what-is-a-business-analyst-role-anyway/

What are the growth prospects? Dunno, but BA roles are independent of specific technologies, and they've infested some of my recent projects like termites, so you should be reasonably future proof if you can get into it (you'll probably need to study/pass some kind of certification). Anyway, it's probably better than being a depressed, demotivated,unemployed ex-Java developer, eh?

Good luck.
mygalla shresha
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 20, 2009
Posts: 7
@Chris Thanks for taking your time to respond to my concern. Will consider this discussion as closed!
Jayesh A Lalwani
Bartender

Joined: Jan 17, 2008
Posts: 2383
    
  28

BA role does require a lot of documentation though, and in smaller shops, the BA is effectively the tester. You might have to be a tester first before you grow into a BA role. Usually, I have seen BAs come up from 2 different places a) testers who have technical training and build a deep understanding of the business while testing the product or b) people with business qualifications who have a good technical aptitude and build a good understanding of the product while using it.

If you have no business qualifications, and you don't want to test or document, why would anyone hire you as a BA?
mygalla shresha
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 20, 2009
Posts: 7
@Jayesh. Thanks for your response. Actually i was leaning more towards a person who understands the customer requirements and translate it to a design/architecture which the desgn team would go ahead and implement! My understanding after talking to some of my ex-colleagues is this. As far as documentation goes it is not a necessity though it may be a requirement. If you consider companies operating in Agile mode, nonone has the time to document or the requirements change rapidly and they may have to change the design..

Thanks
Shresha
 
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