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Hosting java web application in cloud

 
Mat Anthony
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Hi All,
I'm thinking of hosting my java application on Amazon Elastic Beanstalk.
Are they any good?
Whats the performance like?


Mat
 
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Google App Engine Java Ruby
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I haven't tried Amazon, but there are alternatives like Heroku, Google AppEngine, OpenShift which provide cloud based solutions for deploying java applications.
 
Mat Anthony
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Thank Mohamed
 
Eric D. Schabell
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Take a look at Openshift, you can find the quickstart guides and get going for free with up to 3 gears (3 instances): https://www.openshift.com

See the Get Started link. The most work you will have to do is to sign up (regiser)! ;)

-- erics
 
Mat Anthony
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Hi Eric,
whats the performance like using openshift?. I have a CRUD web application developed using spring, hibernate and jsf. Could openshift be used for a live production application that has many users?

Mat
 
Mohamed Sanaulla
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Mat Anthony wrote:Hi Eric,
whats the performance like using openshift?. I have a CRUD web application developed using spring, hibernate and jsf. Could openshift be used for a live production application that has many users?

Mat

Performance wise you can always scale up by purchasing a paid subscription, but as long as you are under the limits of free usage you need not pay anything much.
You have to quantify the term: "many users"- 1000 users? or 100000 users?
 
Eric D. Schabell
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Mat Anthony wrote:Hi Eric,
whats the performance like using openshift?. I have a CRUD web application developed using spring, hibernate and jsf. Could openshift be used for a live production application that has many users?

Mat


For the free version of OpenShift you get 3 gears, should you choose to apply them to your single application they give you the following as stated on the OpenShift site https://www.openshift.com/blogs/openshift-delivers-more-free-memory-and-storage-for-your-applications:

Posted April 24th, "As of today, when you sign up for OpenShift you'll get access to a total of 1.5 GB of memory and 3 GB of storage, for FREE! Which also means more memory and storage per app. These 1.5 GBs of memory are distributed across three cloud computing units that in OpenShift parlance we call "Gears"; which means that in our free tier you get three Gears with 500MB of memory and 1GB storage each. OpenShift can assign these three Gears to a single app and its Cartridges (Cron, MySQL, etc.) or you can use each Gear for a separate application."

That should give you an idea what you can expect for free, imagine if you need more what you can achieve by going paid? ;)

Costs outlined here: https://www.openshift.com/faq/are-there-different-gear-sizes-and-how-much-do-they-cost
 
Mat Anthony
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Hi Eric and Mohamed,
thank you for all the info. I will give openshift a go.

Mat
 
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