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Design Patterm Doubt

 
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I have worked on Core Java, JSP, Servlets and Struts. But I don't know Design Patterns. My question is how far the design pattern is useful for developers? or Let rephrase the question, whether the developer has to know design patterns?

Any way, I am in interest of learning Design Patterns. Which is the best book for Design Patterns for beginners?
 
Greenhorn
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Originally posted by Micheal John:
I have worked on Core Java, JSP, Servlets and Struts. But I don't know Design Patterns. My question is how far the design pattern is useful for developers? or Let rephrase the question, whether the developer has to know design patterns?

Any way, I am in interest of learning Design Patterns. Which is the best book for Design Patterns for beginners?



Hi,
I think if you know design pattern,you will know what you are doing and be more clear about your code.Also you will learn the experience from the other gurus.
The struts framework has used many design patterns such MVC,Template Method,Singleton.
For example,when we create a class that extends Action,we write our own execute method,the others is implemented by the Action base class.this is a template method pattern.
For me,the design pattern book that i think is good is the 'head first',the book is easy to read and understand.
Maybe you can have a look at it.
[ November 07, 2006: Message edited by: lin yic ]
 
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I didn't find the Head First Design Patterns as good as expected, compared to Head First EJB (which I found very useful). Personally, I learned more from reading the original GoF Design Patterns book. They are both good books, though, and either one should teach you what you need.

The HF book only brushes upon som of the patterns in the GoF book. The advantage of the HF book is that it focuses on the patterns that have become most widespread, and only brushes upon the patterns which isn't in widespread use. The advantage of the GoF book is that it covers all patterns well, and it is far easier to look up a pattern in it - as a reference work, it is the superior of the two. As a learning manual - it depends on your personal taste which is the better one.
[ November 07, 2006: Message edited by: �dne Brunborg ]
 
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GoF book is in C++ and not as fun as Head First DP,I really liked it and recommend it agains Gof.

I also skimmed through Design Patterns Java Companion,Design patterns Java workbooks,Design Patterns in Java but none has nice samples as Head First.
 
author
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In my opinion, the GoF design patterns should be in the standard toolbox of every serious OO developer.

I found the GoF book a little bit dry to read, though, and found it much easier to understand after having read "Refactoring" by Martin Fowler.

The newer "Agile Software Development - Principles, Patterns and Practices" by Robert C. Martin also is a good introduction to the topic.

Moving to our OO forum...
 
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Design Patterns are extremely useful, if only to create a common language around developers. I mean, it's easier to say "we need a singleton" than to start describing the singleton pattern everytime it needs to be used.

One thing I found frustrating about the GOF book was the fact that it was language agnostic. If the examples were in Java, I would have found it much easier to read.

Cheers!

-Cameron McKenzie
 
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Cameron Mckenzie wrote: If the examples were in Java, I would have found it much easier to read.

If that's an issue, consider Design Patterns in Java.
 
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Also Thinking in Patterns in Java which is free online. I only gave it a quick read a while ago and didn't think it added much to the "dryness" of the GOF even though all the examples are in Java. Let us know if you like it.
 
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