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mister krabs
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Howdy and welcome to the authors of the book from this week's giveaway. Frank Budinsky, Dave Steinberg, and Ed Merks will be here for the rest of the week to talk to us about their new book, "Eclipse Modeling Framework". So everyone give them a big howdy and make them feel welcome.
Frank I have updated you to official "author" status and gave you access to the author's corral. When your partners show up let me know and I'll update them too!
Enjoy the week!
 
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Welcome Frank , Dave and Ed Merks.
Thomas you are late today!
 
Author
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Thank you Thomas and Pradeep.
I already posted my "what our book is all about note" on another thread, but here it is one more time to make it easier for people to find:
Hello all.
Our new book, Eclipse Modeling Framework, is a thorough introduction to and developer quick reference for a powerful Eclipse framework (and code generator) by the same name (EMF for short). When we stated working on EMF (the framework), a few years ago now, we were looking to provide fine-grain data integration for the tools in IBM's next generation development environment, WebSphere Studio. We knew that Eclipse itself would provide a great platform for integration at the UI and file level, but we also needed support for fine-grain data sharing between the tools.
To share data between tools, one needs a description of the data being manipulated by the tools. Given such a description, we could then provide framework support and a code generator to produce an implementation for accessing the data. Our first approach was to describe the data using a modeling tool (Rational Rose), and then generate code from that. It worked quite well, but we soon noticed that some of the tools already had their "model definition" in another form (e.g., an XML Schema, or a set of Java interfaces) from which one needed to manually create a UML (Rose) class diagram to describe the same thing. That's when it hit us that what we really needed was to allow a model definition to be provided in any of these forms - they really were, after all, just different ways of providing the same information. This approach would have the potential to unify three important technologies like never before - Java, XML, and UML - and really make modeling practical and useful to the mainstream Java programmer and to bridge the gap between modelers and Java programmers.
EMF has been extremely successful in meeting these goals. In fact, it turns out that EMF has much broader appeal then even we imagined. EMF's applicablity extends far beyond tools in an IDE, to essentially any application that manipulates data. It generates clean and efficient code, that can easily be merged with hand written code, so there are very few applications that can't benefit from EMF. Given a model definition, we also realized that we could generate even more of the application - even UIs. We also carefully designed EMF so that it could be used standalone, outside of Eclipse. Our experience has been that it has had a huge positive effect on
productivty and integration, of every application it's been used with - tools or otherwise.
So, now that I've given my obligatory sales job, we'd love to hear your comments and questions. I, along with two of my co-authors, Dave Steinberg and Ed Merks, will be looking forward to answering all of your questions, so please ask away!
Frank.
P.S. You can take a look at the Excerpt (Chapter 2) sample pages of the Eclipse Modeling Framework book at amazon.com:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0131425420/ref=lib_rd_ss_TT01/102-1364017-8080960?v=glance&s=books&vi=reader&img=19#reader-link
for a good overview of EMF.
 
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Welcome to Javaranch. From the description itself, book seems to be quite interesting. Though I have been using Eclipse for some time was not aware of these features
 
Frank Budinsky
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Thanks Bhushan. It's great to be here.
We're surprised ourselves by how many eclipse users haven't heard of EMF. Once people hear about it, we usually get very favorable feedback ... but getting the word out about how generally applicable it is, is harder than we expected.
Frank.
 
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Frank Budinsky:
Thanks Bhushan. It's great to be here.
We're surprised ourselves by how many eclipse users haven't heard of EMF. Once people hear about it, we usually get very favorable feedback ... but getting the word out about how generally applicable it is, is harder than we expected.
Frank.


Being a regular at JavaRanch should help!
 
Bring out your dead! Or a tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
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