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book about Eclipse plugin design

 
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Can somebody here recommend me a good english book about the design of
different eclipse plug-ins?
 
author
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I have Contributing to Eclipse, which I like very much. I'm not sure if it's the best one to teach you how to design plugins but it certainly teaches you how to write testable plugins (one of the authors is Kent Beck -- the one who wrote the XP "white book").
 
author and iconoclast
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Mac OS X Eclipse IDE Chrome
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Both Eclipse in Action and The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse are both excellent and do a great job of teaching plugin development. The latter book is thicker and has more information. The first book was a better read (in my opinion.)
 
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
Both Eclipse in Action
The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse are both excellent and do a great job of teaching plugin development.


Thanks. One quick question though. With the advent of eclipse 3.0, do these books suddenly become outdated?
The only eclipse book available here is 'Eclipse in Action' and I was wondering if its ok to go ahead and buy that. Hope 3.0 is not a rewrite.
 
Dastardly Dan the Author
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
Both Eclipse in Action and The Java Developer's Guide to Eclipse are both excellent and do a great job of teaching plugin development. The latter book is thicker and has more information. The first book was a better read (in my opinion.)


Ouch! I know that you're not talking about my chapters. Seriously, if you have suggestions on how we could make it more readable, let us know (note that "rewrite it" isn't a helpful suggestion ). We setup a JDG2E group for that purpose.
-- Dan
 
Dan Kehn
Dastardly Dan the Author
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Originally posted by karthik Guru:
Hope 3.0 is not a rewrite.


There is a considerable number of new topics and refinements in 3.0, but not too many that invalidate previous references. I don't believe it it worth waiting for a new edition of whatever book you are considering, plus the online docs are starting to shape up for 3.0. Now is as good as any time to start learning.
-- Dan
 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Originally posted by Dan Kehn:

Ouch! I know that you're not talking about my chapters.


Sorry Dan, I guess that does sound cruel, especially after you answered an Eclipse question for me once. I did say that your book was "excellent" however.
The plain fact of the matter was that I enjoyed reading EIA more because it is smaller and contains less information. When I was a rank Eclipse newbie, I found EIA just about right for helping me get my bearings and learning the concepts. It was a good "first pass."
Now, having been through both books, Dan's is the one that I turn to for reference information. JDGTE is closer to being a reference book than is EIA (it's 850 pages as opposed to EIA's 370), and the only problem with reference books is that if you don't know what's going on, it can be hard to look anything up (if a rank newbie sees the message "Hit any key to continue," he's going to try to look up the "any" key in the index, and he's going to be unhappy if it's not there.)
 
Dan Kehn
Dastardly Dan the Author
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:

Sorry Dan, I guess that does sound cruel, especially after you answered an Eclipse question for me once. I did say that your book was "excellent" however.


No sweat, I was joking, really. Remember, I was the one who called out the Sheriff; I don't mind taking a little heat if there's something to be learned from it.
We recognize that our book is *ahem*... large. We prefer to say "impressively comprehensive," but no matter, we accept that the number of topics Eclipse offers isn't going down. Realizing how the sheer volume can become overwhelming, we're interested in ways of making it more accessible. If you have concrete suggestions, please feel free to join and contribute to our JDG2E group. Thanks!
-- Dan
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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