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CVS Question: 2 Parts  RSS feed

 
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The other day I setup a CVS server for myself at work. It can only be accessed when I am at work. So tonight I am working on some code, making some changes, adding some files etc. When I get to work tomorrow I am going to check in all my changes and additions.

I know using CVS you are supposed to comment on commits and I usually just type something quick like "added method for doing bla". But with as many changes as I am making what is the best way to keep track so that my commit comments are so long they make no sense.

Part 2 of this is, throughout the day, how often should I commit changes? Is there a standard so many lines of code, so many minutes/hours, etc? Is it completely up to me? I realize this might be different for me than from the norm as I have no one else working on the code so I don't have to worry about diffs.
 
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I find that on only-me projects, my commit messages aren't very useful and often don't make sense. But on group projects, where we have CVS mail check-in messages to everybody, I find I write them as if I'm sending an email to everybody telling them what I've done, and they're way better. You could try thinking of it that way, but personally, I've never been able to do a good job of writing CVS commit messages on one-man projects, either.

As far as how often: every time you get a green bar, and certainly no less than every half-hour or so. I follow this procedure both by myself and on group projects, where it's even more important.
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Thanks Ernest. That helps.
 
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
But on group projects, where we have CVS mail check-in messages to everybody, I find I write them as if I'm sending an email to everybody telling them what I've done, and they're way better.



I feel similarly since Eclipse 3 supports commit sets (basically it groups incoming changes by commit comment in the synchronize view).


As far as how often: every time you get a green bar, and certainly no less than every half-hour or so. I follow this procedure both by myself and on group projects, where it's even more important.



Another take on it is to ask yourself: "If I do something really stupid now, would I be comfortable loosing all the work since the last checkin?" When the answer is "no", it's time for a commit...
 
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