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padmshree Patil
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Hi,
From which website I can download Linux ?
Also I need complete instalation guide.
I tried with ww.redhat.com site but I am confussed about downloding.
thanks,
padmashree
 
Jim Lang
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http://www.linux-mandrake.com/
from that page, click on 'download' and then choose the nearest ftp server to you (they're listed by country). It'll take up about 1Gig of space and I'd imagine you'll need a fairly decent internet connection speed to download it (ie. I wouldn't advise it if you are using a 56Kbps modem because it'll take ages).
There's loads of documentation on their site which should help you.
 
Frank Carver
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The thing about Linux is that it is available in hundreds of different versions (known as "distributions"), all aimed at different people and different uses. Each distribution contains a Linux kernel and a (probably large) collection of programs to use with it.
Which one you choose depends on what is important to you. If you have a large hard disk and plan to install from CD-ROM, from example, then one of the larger, more comprehensive distributions may be a good choice, so you have lots of stuff put on your system (SuSE Linux comes on 8 or 9 CDs, for example). If you have a smaller PC or plan to download from the internet, you probably want to go for a smaller distribution.
What you plan to use the system for should also affect your choice. If you are setting up a simple, task-specific machine like a print server or network router you can get specific versions of Linux. If you want to use a fancy graphic desktop, games and office tools, you should choose a different version.
Linux distributions are available in English, or in several other languages. They are available to download, on cheap CDs (often less than $5), or at varying prices with varying amounts of support and manuals. For a good list of all these, see http://www.linux.org/dist/index.html . In fact, I strongly recommend the http://www.linux.org/ site as a whole.
 
padmshree Patil
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Hi,
I am learning UNIX .I am planning to install linux and practice at home. I learnt from instructor that we have to make partission or have to install linux in different h/w.

Basically I wanted to know how to use it for Servlet ,JSp ,etc programmes.
Thanks
padmashree
 
Frank Carver
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Although finding an old PC and using it solely for Linux is the simplest and best way to so it. You can also make a "dual-boot" system with Linux on part of your hard disk (or on one whole HD if you have more than one) and Windows on another part. This can be risky, though - if you get the installation wrong, you can lose all your Windows data and programs
If you have only one PC, and don't want to risk losing your Windows settings, the easiest way these days is to use one of the distributions which can boot from within Windows and stores the whole Linux filesystem in a single file on the Windows disk.
 
Adrian Yan
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Decide which dist you are gonna use, then go to www.linuxiso.org and download them.
From the posting, I assume you never use Linux before, personally, I would recommend you to purchased a box-set, they usually come with documentations that will help you. Suse has the best documentation, btw.
 
Hari Gangadharan
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Padmashree --
As Frank has suggested, it is better to find an old hardware and create a Linux PC out of it. If you do not have that, you have to partition your hard disk so that you can use your default (mostly Windows) OS and Linux. These are the things you should keep in mind:
1. If you use fdisk or a normal disk partitioning tool the current data will be lost.
2. You should keep a bootable disk for linux since if you install windows after installing Linux, the Windows install will overwrite the master boot record and you may never be able to log into Linux.
3. You remember to create a small partiton of 64 MB for Linux swap. You may sometime run into trouble if do not do that.
4. If you have a PCI modem most probably you may have to replace it.
If you do not want to loose data in your hard-drive, try using Ranish partition manager or Partiton Magic. Also read the partiton primer at Ranish's home page:
http://come.to/ranish
As somebody already have recommended, I would also recommend using Linux Madrake 7.2 if you are a beginner or if this system is for personal use.
I hope this will help - I am happy to help you if you have any more questions.

------------------
Hari Gangadharan
Unix is user friendly..
but it chooses to whom it is friendly with!
 
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