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Adam Rhodes
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So, I've been having trouble getting my Linksys Ethernet 10/100 card to work properly in Red Hat 7.1 and I have two questions.... First... is there any way to definitively tell if my network card is working... I've tried pinging myself and that works, but ifconfig comes back with errors and I can't ping off my network....
Second... do I need to recompile my drivers? Does 7.1 not come with the most up to date Tulip drivers?
thanks,

adam
 
ersin eser
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Linux Support
Many Linksys network adapters are ready to run with Linux, provided you're using Linux kernel version 2.x or higher. When you're ready to install your card, follow the appropriate guidelines below to make sure that you load the proper driver for your adapter.
DISCLAIMER: Linksys regularly tests its network adapters with Linux, and finds that the adapters work well in our testing lab. However, Linux software drivers for Linksys network adapters are developed independently by third-party developers who support the Linux open source philosophy. Linksys is not responsible for guaranteeing the compatibility of its adapters with Linux, since it does not control how or by whom network drivers are developed.
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Ether16 LAN Card
If you have the plug-and-play version of the Ether16 (released in mid-1997), install the card in a DOS workstation and run its Setup program to take the card out of plug-and-play mode before beginning the Linux installation--the card won't work properly with Linux while in plug-and-play mode.
This card will work with the ne driver (ne2000) in most distributions using Kernel 2.x

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EtherPCI LAN Card
This card works with the tulip driver in all distributions that have kernel 2.x
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EtherPCI II LAN Card
This card will work with most distributions using Kernel 2.0.34 or higher using the ne driver (ne2000).
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EtherFast 10/100 CardBus PC Card
The following must be done as root.
All of the setup instructions are contained in your Linux package. When you unpack your archive, look for a "how-to" document concerning the installation of PCMCIA cards. When you find the file, read it and follow the directions. You'll need to install the PCMCIA services, enable networking, recompile the kernel if needed.
Recently the controller chip used on our card has had a rev change. The old version was a DEC 21143 TC the new version is a DEC 21143 TD. Some compatability issues with the Tulip driver have been noted and are currently undergoing developement and testing to include the new chip changes. We will provide a link the the driver as soon as it is available.
You must add the following to /etc/pcmcia/config: device "tulip_cb"
class "network" module "cb_enabler", "tulip_cb"
card "Linksys EtherFast 10/100 CardBus PC Card"
manfid 0x0149, 0xc2ab
bind "tulip_cb"
You must obtain the latest tulip.c driver from Donald Becker. This is a special version for PCMCIA cards.
Compile tulip.c with this command:
gcc -DMODULE -D__KERNEL__ -I/usr/src/linux/net/inet
-Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -O6 -c tulip.c -o tulip_cb.o
`[ -f /usr/include/linux/modversions.h ] && echo -DMODVERSIONS`
-DCARDBUS
After this is complete, copy tulip_cb.o to /lib/modules/< kernel.version >/pcmcia.
Issue a kill -HUP < cardmgr pid >, or if you are using redhat issue /etc/rc.d/init.d/pcmcia stop, then start or just reboot the computer.
After this point, the PC Card will be automatically recognized as soon as you plug it in. You must have version 3.0.5 of the Linux PCMCIA services or higher to support CardBus. You can ftp the latest version here

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EtherFast 10/100 PC Card
All of the setup instructions are contained in your Linux package. When you unpack your archive, look for a "how-to" document concerning the installation of PCMCIA cards. When you find the file, read it and follow the directions. You'll need to install the PCMCIA services, enable networking, and finally, recompile the kernel. After this point, the PC Card will be automatically recognized as soon as you plug it in. You must have version 2.9.10 of the Linux PCMCIA services or higher. You can ftp the latest version here
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PCMCIA EthernetCard
All of the setup instructions are contained in your Linux package. When you unpack your archive, look for a "how-to" document concerning the installation of PCMCIA cards. When you find the file, read it and follow the directions. You'll need to basically install the PCMCIA services, enable networking, and finally, recompile the kernel. After this point, the EthernetCard will be automatically recognized as soon as you plug it in. you can FTP the latest version here.
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PCMCIA LANmodem
All of the setup instructions are contained in your Linux package. When you unpack your archive, look for a "how-to" document concerning the installation of PCMCIA cards. When you find the file, read it and follow the directions. You'll need to install the PCMCIA services, enable networking, and finally, recompile the kernel. After this point, the EthernetCard will be automatically recognized as soon as you plug it in. You must have version 2.9.2 of the Linux PCMCIA services or higher. If you don't, you can FTP the latest version here.
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EtherFast 10/100 LANmodem 56K
All of the setup instructions are contained in your Linux package. When you unpack your archive, look for a "how-to" document concerning the installation of PCMCIA cards. When you find the file, read it and follow the directions. You'll need to install the PCMCIA services, enable networking, and finally, recompile the kernel. After this point, you will need to add the following lines to /etc/pcmcia/config:
card "Linksys EtherFast LANmodem 56K"
version "Linksys", "EtherFast 10&100 + 56K PC Card (PCMLM56)"
bind "pcnet_cs", "serial_cs"
after adding these lines, restart the pcmcia services or reboot the system. The EthernetCard and modem will be automatically recognized as soon as you plug it in. You must have version 3.0.9 of the Linux PCMCIA services or higher. If you don't, you can FTP the latest version here.
[This message has been edited by ersin eser (edited July 17, 2001).]
 
Tim Holloway
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I've been buying LinkSys cards for some time now precisely because they've worked so well for me with RedHat. The tulip driver with RedHat 6.1 was out of date, but the 7.x drivers never gave me a problem.
You need an "alias eth0 tulip" in /etc/modules.conf and the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file generated by the network config program (was /sbin/netconf, but RedHat 7 I think deprecated that). If you can get an "up" status and ping from ifconfig, I'd check the cabling.
 
Ryan Senior
Greenhorn
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If you want to increase performance I would recommend compiling the driver into the kernel. I'm not sure if the tulip driver can be compiled in the kernel (some proprietary drivers that aren't GPL'd can't be). But if it can, you'll get better performance than if it was a module.
Ryan
 
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