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Resize partition?  RSS feed

 
Mike Shn
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Hello
Does someone know way to resize partition without backing up?
Thanks
 
James Hobson
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Depends precisely what you want to do.
Which OS, which filesystem, and what do you mean resize?
Many OS/filesystems have a way of enlarging an existing filesystem fairly transparently.
On Solaris you can use DiskSuite or Veritas (or whatever they are called at the moment) to make virtual (logical) disks that are much more easy to change than disk slices.
If you just want more space in a mount point then you can mount new disks inside it (for example if / is getting full you can mount something on /usr/local or whatever).
If you are using FAT, HPFS or any of the more Windozey filesystems, you should be able to use PQMagic (by powerquest) -- I think it does ext2, but I havent used it for years.
On the other hand, anyone who does any of that without backing up first "just in case" is risking a disaster.
 
Tim Holloway
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Partition Magic does handle resigin both Microsoft partitions and Linux ext2. Since ext3 is an extension of ext2, presumably that also, but anny warranties as to that you'll have to obtain from PowerQuest.
There's also a gnu utility - "parted" that can be used, with certain restrictions. It's non-GUI.
 
Tim Holloway
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It's STILL a good idea to backup critical info before resizing partitions, however! There's nothing like an unexpected system crash in the middle of a critical disk operation to really make your day
 
Ashok Mash
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Also its a good idea to defrag your existing partitions thoroughly before using PartitionMagic. This may sound trivial, but its quite important in fact!
 
sandywu Lee
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No matter you have solved your problem or not,I just want to share my feeling with all of you and hope I can provide something useful!

Is it Vista Operation System or some other one? Vista has a function to enlarge and shirink the partitions. If not, I think you have to choose some partition software to help you. You may have a look at this article.http://www.softpedia.com/reviews/windows/EASEUS-Partition-Manager-Server--Review-92249.shtml

Hope piece of information can help you!
 
Jesper de Jong
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On Ubuntu, gparted (the GNOME partition editor) can resize Linux and Windows partitions.

If you don't have Ubuntu (or another Linux distro) installed, you can use the GParted Live CD. Download the CD image, burn it on a CD and boot from the CD. You can even put it on an USB stick and boot from that.
[ September 19, 2008: Message edited by: Jesper Young ]
 
Jesper de Jong
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Oh, I see you responsed to a six year old topic!
 
Joe Ess
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I sure hope Mike wasn't waiting around for six years for you guys to chime in!
DontWakeTheZombies
 
Tim Holloway
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All You Zombies...

Actually, FIRST do an fsck or scandisk (whatever works for the OS/filesystem in question). That way you don't get killed by damaged files, and with luck, any bad spots on the drive will be taken out of service.

THEN defrag.

THEN back it up. If you prefer, you can back up, then defrag.

NOW you can resize the partition.

I had a blowout myself this weekend, but I'm using LVM, so I found myself a bigger logical volume, booted into rescue mode, mounted the new and old partitions, did a cp -arp from old to new and then mounted the root so I could edit the /etc/fstab to know about the changes.

The hardest part was remembering how to activate the logical volumes so they could be mounted. The current Red Hat/Fedora/CentOS rescue boots don't do that automatically.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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