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Ranch Hand
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Hi ,
I am searching where my Linux kernel is
i looked at /usr/src/ but i couldnt find
the linux file or directory, but i have rpm files
could anyone suggest me where i should find
my linux kernel.
also i like to know the simple command for how to search for directories. i know we could use grep to find files.
i am using Mandrake Linux 8.2
Thanks
regards
Chandhrasekar Saravanan
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 4
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"/usr/src/linux" is the usual (and standard) place for the Linux kernel source. It is entirly possible that you just do not have the kernel source on your machine. If, however, you don't want the kernel source, but the actual compiled kernel that your computer is using, look around in the / directory and also the /boot directory.
As far as searching for files and directories, there is at least a dozen Linux commands that can be used. I usually stick to the 'find' command. Its syntax is 'find {directory} -name [filename]'. And it will search recursivly from the given directory. Wildcards work for the filename, also. So, for instance, you could type 'find / -name etc' to find all "etc" directories on your computer (since it will start from the / directory).
Hope this helps.
 
Saloon Keeper
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"find" is wonderful, but some systems run a utility about once a day that builds a file database - use the "locate" command to search it - it's often faster if you're looking for things that don't move around much.
It wasn't actually SAID whether the "kernel" desired was A) the live kernel B) the results of a kernel build or C) the kernel source. If you haven't installed the kernel source package or done a kernel build, that would only leave the live kernel, which is in "/boot". If you're installing source RPMs, rpm -qa | grep kernel will let you see what you've installed and "rpm -ql kernel-source" or something like that will show you where the files were installed.
 
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