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How different is Java Development on Linux?  RSS feed

 
Ravee Bhat
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Hi All,
Recently In an ad I saw "Java development Skills on Linux/Unix requierd". Just wondering how different it is to develop java applications on Linux or Unix?
With excellent IDEs like eclipse, etc and app servers like tomcat, webshpere etc and other databases it should be smooth sailing. I would rather say it is just a matter of perspective. I believe if someone starts her/his first project on Linux platform then even s/he might find migrating to windows difficult. (generally shift from win to U/Linux is considered difficult).
Any ideas anyone? Is it really easy to develop java application on u/linux?
[ January 13, 2003: Message edited by: Ravee Bhat ]
 
Lewin Chan
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It's very easy to development on unix if you are using the usual java development tools like ant. Both netbeans and eclipse have a GUI editor on linux, if that kind of thing is your bag, so realistically there is little change to your workspace.
I try to do all my development on a linux machine, this forces me to be less lax when it comes to assumptions such as file permissions and server sockets, as on win2k everyone generally has access to the full filesystem, and can listen on sockets < 1024...
(failing that I immediately install cygwin on a win2k machine, just so I can get vi style commandline editing).
Recently In an ad I saw "Java development Skills on Linux/Unix requierd".

An ad like this that specifically references Linux/Unix would imply to me that they are expecting you to be familiar with the unix shell, to be happy to do development through a VT100 session rather than some fancy gui.
 
Tim Holloway
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IDEs are nice, but Java IDEs run poorly on anything with less than 256MB RAM and a 600MHz Pentium processor or equivalent, and that's regardless of the OS.
Under Windows, I used an IDE more often, but in a pinch, just used Notepad. In Linux, I'm frequently using Emacs, since my pet development machine is only a P-200. Most Ant-based projects will run unchanged under either OS, expecially if you take advantage of the fact that the backslashes in Windows filenames can be coded as forward slashes where Java is involved (do remember to pay attention to upper/lower case, though!).
What I really dread is going back to Windows and losing all those useful Unix commands such as "find". I don't expect the average employer (assuming I ever have one again) to allow me to use cygwin.
In the U.S. resumes have to get past a computerised scanner and then a technologically-ignorant HR department running an all-or-nothing checklist before they ever stand a chance of being read by someone who might give you the benefit of possibly having enough intelligence to learn anything. Much less accept equivalences for OS's or other software packages.
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
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