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linux newbie needs some ideas  RSS feed

 
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hello all,
i'm a database developer and dba that works on multi platforms.
i am looking from a linux distribution that works with db2 oracle cloudscape mysql ...
1. i looking for a linux vendor?
2. a good book ... i'm looking for content not volumne
3. a good reference book
4. which gui's to install
5. which dev tools to install
i building a new maching next week maybe a 2 or 4 by processor if i can afford it.
any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Well, if you're looking for DB2 and Oracle, you probably need Red Hat 7.2 (and not 7.3 or 8.x!). In Europe, I *think* SuSe may be certified for both of the about, but I'd check. MySQL would run under most any Linux distro.
I'm afraid I'm useless for docs - I got started using a books that essentially a printed edition of the Linux HOWTOS (see tldp.org), but that book is woefully out of print/date.
Eclipse is a good start for GUIs. IBM's created it and is effectively moving away from Visual Age and towards it, even though the core Eclipse is free. Personally, I'm using Emacs because I don't often do GUI debugging and Emacs works on the 200MHz machine I do most of my work on. For GUI debugging, I switch to an Athlon XP1800+ and Eclipse. One thing Eclipse lacks, however that the commercial products such as NetBeans/Forte and Borland offer is the ability to visually design Swing and AWT GUI apps.
For Java, the only developers kit you actually NEED is either the Sun JDK or an equivalent such as the one from IBM (mind flashed blank, forgot the name). For C/C++, the gcc that comes with the Linux distro is the standard. That's discounting LISP, Perl, Tcl/Tk, Python, M4, Gnat (Ada), F77 (FORTRAN) and other programming languages that come with Linux.
If you're into UML, check out ArgoUML or its commercial variant Poseidon from Gentleware.
Will that do for a start?
 
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well, i cannot add anything to what tim said... but i can say that i agree with everything.
i recently moved from redhat 7.2 to suse 8.1... i absolutely love it. it supports mysql and i read something about oracle in the documentation (i have not tried it yet).
i also use eclipse on my faster machine (also an athlon xp 1.8). however, i prefer emacs for basic coding.
i installed posiedon a couple weeks ago for a class at school and it seems to work very well... it is on a winblows machine, though.
 
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If you are DBA, you better go with redhat(7.2 or 7.3).
For Oracle 9i, you just need to change some kernel configuration. and change the script for Oracle 9i. you can find out howto easily from the google search. let me know what you want.
The reason why you change the kernel is default redhat installation for kernel semaphore is not you are looking for since oracle needs to have lots of semaphore and swap space( i remember 1G at least for swap space(tmp space)). the script doesn't quite support for oracle 9i. That's not redhat's fault. Oracle 9i didn't change it. The installation might hang up at the last process(CD3). (for 9i-01 version. not sure 9i.2 version).
If you want to install DB2, you should definately go with redhat 7.3(kernel 2.4.10), ibm officially support this version. For mysql and postgresql, you don't have to worry about it at all. While you are installing linux, just add mysql necessary files and put daemon on it. Default installation will be postgresql for redhat.
For gui, i use GNOME/Windowmaker, i would use windowmaker if you are good at shell in general.
Gnome has GUI support for utility for user admin and daemon admin stuffs. KDE is popular for end-user not for DBA or developer.
No devtools are necessary to install linux and DBs you mention if you have right knowledge to install.(CD, manual, knowledge of basic shell, unix command).
Don't forget to arrange harddrive management carefully. partition is crucial for installing large sized database. you should also concern about overflowing /var when your db needs to have lots of connection. So generous on /var capacity. (i would go with 1G).
Example partition for Database management
/ 1GB(still concern about overflow)
/var 1GB( same reason)
/tmp 1GB - 2GB
/usr 4GB (all the linux software goes here)
/opt 10GB (oracle, db2, and commercial software only)
/home (user data)
/data 10GB - whatever you want (data partition)
/data2 10GB - whatever you want (back up?)

Good luck and happy linuxing.
 
stephen Kang
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another thing is SuSe is good for the database performance since default file system using ReiserFS instead of ext3.
But SuSe is good for european, Redhat is good for usa market. There is some connection suse and ibm though.
Websphere 5 and DB2 are supporting redhat 7.3 (kernel 2.4.10) not 8.0. not sure of suse.
I succeded to install
WSAD4.03(using IBM Http Server) and WSAD5(using Apache plugin), eclipse (forgot the version)
Websphere 4.03 and Websphere 5 Advanced version.
Lotus R5, R6
Oracle 9i-01, mysql and postgresql(7.2) on redhat 7.3
For Websphre 5 if you want to enable IBM MQ series, don't forget to add mqm and mkbrkrs user id and group id on it and set mqm's directory to /var/lib/mqm. otherwise, the installation will hang up.
Basic little thing is Java sdk is necessary any ibm and oracle products. Adding necessary environment variable and (db node name)SID to your .bashrc on your DB account profile is very important otherwise, you have to reinstall or even reinstall linux again.

I still have some problem with redhat 8.0 but don't have time to play.
Anyways, ow come nobody wants me to hire some system or db entry or trainee just because i don't have industry experience on this?
 
Tim Holloway
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I'd doublecheck that RedHat version. So far as I know, both Oracle and DB2 are still not actually certified past (or before) 7.2, and this includes the latest DB2 for Linux. A large part of the problem is that RedHat finally started migrating gcc libraries to what the rest of the world was already pretty much using, but Oracle and DB2 were still hung up on the old gcc.
I *did* get Oracle 9i to install under RedHat8, though it broke in a few places doing so. Yes, never mind what Larry says, Oracle's more fragile than it should be - at least in the install. Mostly because they skimped on reporting errors. Anything that causes a copy to fail gets you a generic error that's "probably a full disk". Not on my empty 40GB drive, it's not! DB2 is not much better - they make some assumptions that they really shouldn't.
Both DB2 and Oracle install their own copies of the JDK. It makes a fat product even fatter, but keeps them from having JDK version-related problems.
Now as far as getting hired as a database programmer. Companies only want people with 3 years more experience than the product has actually been in existence. But not 5 years more, because then you'd demand too much money. No hiring process I've ever encountered has been willing to give you credit for any intelligence or ability to learn. They demand "instant productivity". Which is why we generally get our jobs via inside connections that bypass that process.
Of course, sometimes we don't have any inside connections
 
stephen Kang
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Tim,
Currently, i am working on java - xml as a developer though it's contract position and not stable.
I love to work on sys-db admin with linux based system so that i could look for architect position in the future. I used to be SigUnix while i was in college as FreeBSD guru (i mean as a student guru .
Anyways, does suse is well configured with ibm products? Seems like united linux, initiated by sco, suse, and two more distribution company and hp, ibm want to encourage this dist, could be big buzzword soon.
What about the certification like Linux+, LPI, and RHCE?
Is it gonna help me to land syslinux job in this harsh market?
Anyways,
is it okay with some gnu linux, gentoo, or slackware with those enterprise products?
Your comment will be appreciated.
 
Tim Holloway
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Stephen, you're asking the wrong person. I haven't gotten a paycheck in nearly 2 years now and no relief in sight. Every time things started looking up, yet another local employer dumped 20-50 IT people on the street and bragged to the local newspapers about how much they were going to save because they'd outsourced their development to India. Then they wonder why no one's buying their products and this year's tax collections are off! Hey, if I ain't got any income, I ain't spending any money!
Certifications don't do much for me. The SCJP always struck me as a combination of traps for C++ programmers and exercises to see if one could make sense of of programming practices that would incite me to assault if anyone used them on the job. However the RHCE and CCNA exams seem to be geared more towards detecting actual practical competence, so if I was in a hiring position, I'd look on them favorably.
Which Linux distro you should specialize in for employment purposes depends on what continet you're on. Red Hat is pretty much the standard for the US (and AFAK Canada). South America has its preference, though I can't remember what or if Mexico side with that one or some other. China likes Red Flag, Europe's big on Suse, and so forth.
I wouldn't discount Gentoo, Slackware or even Knoppix, but it's good to show some expertise in one of the more commercially-oriented systems. Mandrake I'd probably give a good credit towards Red Hat on. Unlike HR departments, I do acknowledge equivalencies. For all that's worth.
 
stephen Kang
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Tim,
Sorry about late reply. I was in South florida for one week. So, i didn't have internet connection down there.
You must be right. I think i should go with Redhat at this moment. It seems Redhat is favorable dist in the us market as Suse is for Europe.
Thesse days, it's so hard for one to keep plugging to new job. I might focus on more technical knowledge, which i think much more valuable in the long term than developing position.
I am thinking about getting CCNA,LPI, or OCP DBA.I am not confident about getting RHCE at this moment. ($750 is not that small!!)
Though tons of people have those Certs, i guess those prepares better for me to have potential job opportunity in the long period.
Your comment guides me a good confidence.
Thank you.
 
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