• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Source Code vs. RPM  RSS feed

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 149
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What is better for installation, files in source code or files in RPM? Why?
 
author and jackaroo
Marshal Commander
Posts: 12156
256
C++ Firefox Browser IntelliJ IDE Java Mac Oracle
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Mike,
In general, I try and use the precompiled RPMs first. It just makes life easier since evertyhing is already compiled, and ready to go.
However this does not allways work, especially when versions of required packages comes into play. I am currently running a RedHat 7.1 system with all updates, and yet there are some apps that I cannot install because they "require" later versions of packages than are supported for RedHat 7.x.
Note the quotation marks though - sometimes the Redhat Package Manager gets versioning wrong. If the packager only ever used the latest version of RedHat to build their packages, then their package may work with earlier versions of the libraries - all that is needed is a recompile. For this, I usually use the SRPMs, that way directories and spec files are allready configured for me.
Last ditch effort is when I go back to the tarball and build it myself.
---
I do find that a good tarball, with a proper autoconfig script is invaluable though, especially when installing onto other systems (e.g. AIX). For installs onto other OS'es tarballs definately win.
Regards, Andrew
 
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 18800
74
Android Eclipse IDE Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To get an OS up and going quickly, RPMs are great. However other have different opinions.
One of the leading lights of the local Linux User Group is a big Debian fan and speaks highly of the ability to pop in a floppy to a networkable box and use apt to get everything.
Then there's the "all source" crowd, as exemplified by Gentoo.
For getting started, the absolute quickest thing to do is get a Knoppix CD and get comfortable with Linux without having to zap your current machine. Then once you're ready to make the plunge, a binary distro such as Red Hat or SuSE is a good second step - or Debian, if you'd rather.
The biggest problem in doing "from-source" builds is that if you pull sources from multiple places you get into the conflicting-version trap. Then you end up spending more time getting intercompatible versions than you do in actually building or running the software itself.
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!