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Hi, why noones answer this thread? strange!!!
 
Sheriff
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I though that this post was pretty wierd until I realised you must be referring to your other thread here. As an aside, if you are referring to another thread, it would be very helpful to include a link to it. Even better would be to post in the original thread itself.
Meanwhile. Why has nobody replied to your other question?
My guess is that it's very hard to understand what you are asking. In particular, you seem to have made a lot of typing mistakes (even in the title - I guess you really meant "unix" rather than "unin") and don't seem to have taken the time to even read your own post.
Really you need to let people know at least:
  • what you know already, so we know what you don't need help with
  • why you need help, so we can see that it is worthwhile spending time to answer
  • the details of the environment/language/system etc. you are working with
  • what you have tried that didn't work.
  • how you will know when you have a right answer.


  • Remember that everyone here is a volunteer. Nobody gets paid to answer any questions. There are no "service level guarantees". Those of us who do choose to answer a question do so because we like to help others learn and in the hope that they will in turn share their knowledge with others. We are all busy with our lives and careers and have only a small amount of time that we can spend helping out here.
    So. If you really want an answer to a question, you should try your best to help. Think hard about how you write your question. Be pleasant and polite. Show that you take your question seriously enough to have taken care in asking. Double-check your spelling and typing. Read and re-read your question to make sure it is as clear and unambiguous as possible.
    If you make your question easy and fun to answer, you will get plenty of answers.
    In the light of the above. You may want to try again with your question. :roll:
     
    Mitchell Kave
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    HI frank
    Sorry for the spelling mistakes in "unin"....i don't know that i typed wrongly in there.
    what i just want to know is jst simple only? As i'm new in unix.
    i just wish to know what is "batch processing" "the command of printing"
    and the despatch of reports all about?
    I hope the people who claim themselves to be a moderator should be able to understand this question?
    anyway,thanks a lot for urs replied and hear from u soon.
     
    author
    Sheriff
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    For a definition of "batch processing" go to http://www.whatis.com/ and search for the term.
    I do have no idea what you might refer to by "the command of printing" or "the despatch of reports". I am a moderator, but that doesn't give me the power to read your mind (unfortunately...) Where do these terms come from?
     
    Mitchell Kave
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    ALright.. i get the term in one of the unix books.
    let say.. have u done any reports in unix before?
    or do any batch processing before.........
    plssssssssssssssss
     
    mister krabs
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    Sure.... do you have a question? What language do you intend on writing your reports in? Are these reports for end users? Will they be viewed on paper, a monitor, or from a website? You really need to think about what you are trying to do and formulate a question that can be answered without reading your mind.
    As to what a moderator is on JavaRanch... moderators are not here to answer your questions. We can if we know the answer and want to help but that is not our job. We are here to make sure that questions are asked in the right forum and that everyone obeys the rule of "be nice". So if you ask a question and don't get an answer, don't blame the moderator.
     
    Desperado
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    Mitchell:
    You must be relatively young if you don't know what "batch processing" is.
    BTW (By The Way), you may benefit from a book on introduction to computers and languages in general but that's just my guess.
    One manner of Batch Processing is what was used in the 1960s and 1970s in, for my particular experience, at the University.
    Students would physically carry a bunch of punched cards with, say, FORTRAN code on them, and at the lobby of the computing center pass them through a punched card reader.
    The complete program would then go into a batch probably held in a disk until it was its turn to run. If there were many programs before yours, you had to wait longer for the program to finish at which point one of the computer operators would place the output printed paper in one of the boxes for students to pick up later.
    Of course, you don't need punched cards to have batch processing. The source code can come from any other media like a disk file.
    But I guess that the term "batch" implies one process at a time, one after the other, versus "all at the same time" which is what happened after time sharing appeared. After that, every user at a terminal felt like they had the computer for himself (unless it was very slow that day!)
    One could then enter a program from a disk file and have it execute right then and there, in front of you "as you wait"...
    As a matter of fact, IBM's version of time sharing was called TSO (Time Sharing Option, I think...).
    Even today, some banks for example, use batch processing for their daily routines. Some have upgraded to real-time data base updates though...
     
    Ranch Hand
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    Batch processing is an important part of most enterprise-level busines machines (midrange or mainframe). Most people see computers as devices designed to respond directly to the user. Desktop machines running OS's such as Windows or OSX or Linux are often single user machines dedicated to basically doing what the user tells them to do.
    Batch processing is a basic feature on larger machines because they typically handle more than one user. All these users need to "share" the resources, so the CPU power is switched from one user to another (this is called swapping). However, if one user starts running a job that takes up a ton of cycles (such as printing the entire order history for the last year), then the other users get shortchanged.
    In this situation, theN long-running, resource-intensive job is "submitted to batch". That is, it runs in the background at a lower priority. Interactive jobs typically will run at a higher priority, so whenever they need CPU, they just grab it. But when no user jobs need processing (which is quite often in a typical environment, because of something we lovingly call "operator think time"), the remaining cycles are all magically given to the batch job.
    Now, one of the things batch jobs are really good for is printing. Everybody needs reports, but you can only print one at a time (otherwise the pages get all intermixed and life is difficult). So, rather than the interactive job printing directly to the printer, it instead creates a file with the printed report and then sends a request to a printer job that is running in batch. That job then will only print using CPU cycles that none of the interactive jobs is using.
    In the olden days, we called this "spooling" the report, and the job that actually did the printing was a "print spooler". Back then, printers were these gigantic machines that printed a single line of print at a time, and in a typical job ship you'd here one or more of those things in the background gonig CHUK-CHUK-CHUK all day long. But, when the system got REALLY busy, since there were no cycle for the printer, they'd actually slow down and stop working. You knew the machine was REALLY busy when you heard the line printer go CHUK-(pause)-CHUK-CHUK-(long pause)-CHUK.
    Back to Unix and batch processing and reports. Unix still has pretty rudimentary batch support. You can, using the "at" or "batch" command, run a job in the background. You can also use the "lpr" command to send things to the printer queue. You can remove jobs from either queue. Midranges and mainframes have more extensive job and print control capabilities, from multiple queues to job attributes to the ability to hold and release jobs to the ability to attach to a job and remotely debug it. I'm sure some of this stuff exists in the *nix world, but my guess is it's pretty platform specific and might even be third-party commercial stuff.
    Hope this helps a little.
    Joe
     
    Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
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