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Partitioning scheme for multiple Linux installations  RSS feed

 
Paulo Salgado
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Howdy.
I'm fairly new to the Linux/UNIX world and I'm trying to devise a partitioning scheme for multiple Linux installations in the same hard drive.
I've seen previous posts in this forum and got a bunch of good info as usual.
One question remains though: assuming I will have a single partition for each Linux version I will install, can I have a single Swap partition, or must I have a Swap partition for each corresponding Linux version partition?
 
Alton Hernandez
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Hi,
I don't think that you need different partition for each version of Linux.
A swap file is a swap file and I haven't heard of a new file type of a swap file. It has always been type 82.
Swap files is dependent on the size of your memory and not on the version of your Linux or where these versions are installed. As long as you can mount the swap partition, I believe that you can use it on any version of Linux
 
Andrew Monkhouse
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Hi Paulo,
I assume you are talking about having different versions / distributions all on your hard drive simultaneously, and then you will swap between them.
In which case having separate partitions for them is probably a good idea. Somebody who really knows the distributions / versions at a low level may be able to get them to co-exist on the one partition, but it would be fraught with problems.
I agree with Alton that you should not need more than one swap partition - you should be able to use the same swap partition for all distributions / versions.
You might want to think about having a separate partition for <code>/home</code> and/or <code>/opt</code>. That way you can set up your home environment the way you want it and have it available in all the installations. Likewise you could install some common packages in /opt which would be available in all installations (e.g. the JDK).
Regards, Andrew
 
Paulo Salgado
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Hi.
In fact my goal is to have a few versions/distributions in one hard drive. I'm definetely not planning to have multiple distributions in a single partition (at least for now), but the idea of having /home and/or /opt available for all of them sounds very interesting.
Thank you both for the answers and such a great advice.
 
Tim Holloway
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If I'm not mistaken, you may even be able to use the same swap partition for Windows swapping. For booting multiple Linuxes, you can be as simple as simply placing different kernels into /boot and picking them off the GRUB or LILO menus, though if you're using radically different releases, you may wish to keep the system "sbin" and "bin" directories apart.
 
Chris De Vries
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You can use the same swap partition. For a period of time I had a debian distro and a red hat distro on the same hard drive. I basically made a root partition for debian, a root partition for red hat, and made a separate /usr/local parition which was shared. I also shared /home and had some partitions on a second drive (/data1 and /data2) which were also shared.
 
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