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Rob Hunter
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Hi,
Just started getting into Linux and the system I was looking at it was already logged into. I had a power failure and the system was shut off but when she came back up I was at the command-line login prompt. I logged in and went to the command-line. How do you get from command-line to the GUI interface again? Like I said earlier the GUI was already up and running when I started to playing around. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Rob
[ October 12, 2004: Message edited by: Rob Pike ]
 
Arnaud Burlet
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startx is your friend !

but usually, the GUI is fired automatically on boot up. If you want to have it started on boot, tell us what linux flavor you are using.

Arnaud
 
Rob Hunter
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Hi Arnaud,
I actually found the startx command after doing a bit more searching but I get the following error after a load of other stuff prints :

-FontTransSocketUNIXConnect: Can't connect : errno = 2
failed to se default font path 'unix/:7100'
Fatal server error :
Could not open default font 'fixed'

It is Red Hat 7.2 I'm running.

I'd really appreciate some help on this. Thanks for your response.

Rob
 
Tim Holloway
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That's xfs (the X Font Server) and the exact same thing happened to me too. I haven't yet fixed my own system since I've been distracted, but it's a good ideas to check to see if xfs is running (via "ps" and "/sbin/service xfs status" if redhat/fedora) and listening on port 7100 ("netstat -ln").

After that, you start scanning the system logs starting with /var/log/messages.

Your machine is trying to start X, but X can't run without fonts and by appearances the X font server is damaged so it falls back to text mode.
 
Rob Hunter
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Hi Tim,
Thanks for the response. Just wondering (while I try that) how can the Font Server be repaired if it is, indeed, damaged? Thanks again.

Rob
 
Rob Hunter
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Hi Tim,
No xfs was listed when looking at the current processes. I looked at the messages file and here's what I found :

1. xfs had started successfully.
2. xfs listening on port 7100
3. a whole bunch of "gdm_slave_xioerror_handler: Fatal X error - Restarting: 0" in a row, I believe it was liek 6 or 7
4. deal_with_crashes: Running the XKeepsCrashing script
5. " " " " " disabling display: 0

Can you suggest a way of recovering? Thanks so much.

Rob
 
Stefan Wagner
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I would expect some LOCK-files not beeing deleted by the powerfailure.

Delete the files in /tmp and try a reboot.
 
Arnaud Burlet
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Hi there

I don't really know what the errors you posted mean, but let's not care with such an old red hat version.

you should try to start xfs doing :

and then you will be able to startx.

XFS should be started at boot time, the problem is I don't know how to do that on a redhat system. You can run "setup" and find where to start the xfs service on boot. Or try to find a command beginning with "rc" that matches the following (from gentoo) :

this line adds (on gentoo) xfs to the list of program that should be automaticaly started entering runlevel default (the one your should be working on). Maybe go to #redhat on irc.freenode.net and ask there how to start xfs at boot time.

Hope this helps, Arnaud
 
Tim Holloway
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This isn't just a problem with older RedHat systems. I'm pretty sure one of the ones I trashed was a Fedora.

The system is attempting to start xfs (and X) automatically on bootup, but xfs is damaged and X goes into recovery mode, finally giving up.

I haven't tried to repair my damaged linux yet (it was hurricane Francis that turned the power off for me), but the place to look for lockfiles is /var/lock/subsys. If you see a /var/lock/subsys/xfs, delete it and reboot (or at least restart xfs).

Also, before you do that try "/etc/init.d/xfs status" and see if it says anything. Some services can detect inconsistent state.
 
Rob Hunter
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Thanks for the response guys. I got it working by following the advice in here. I cleared the tmp directory and rebooted (i.e. init 6 for anyone such as myself who is a newbie) and that did the trick. Thanks so much for the information again.

Rob
 
Stefan Wagner
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well - of course the place to look for lockfiles may differ, and some might be in /var/subsys/xfs, but from the messages, it didn't seem to be a problem with xfs, but with the display-variable, which is usually set in the users home (.kde/...something), but symbolic-linked from /tmp.
 
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