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Mac Speed

 
Ranch Hand
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Does Mac Processor Speed mean the same as PC processor speed? I mean, looking at the Apple Store, 1.8 is about as good as it gets at a reasonable price. I can get a 3.0 PC cheaper. How does that compare?
[ October 01, 2004: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
 
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No, it's comparing apple to oranges (pun absolutely intended).

See the Megahertz Myth.
 
blacksmith
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I couldn't find any tests for single processor G5s, perhaps because the iMac was just released. I did find a test that showed a dual processor 2.0 GHz G5 beating a dual processor 2.4GHz Xeon in four out of five tests - by more than a factor of two in one test - which might provide some indication of how a single processor G5 would fare against a single processor Pentium4:

http://www.barefeats.com/pentium4.html

Google came up with half a dozen links on the first page all of which linked to that test.

One thing to note is that Mac OS 10.3 only takes advantage of the 32 bit mode of the G5 processor, despite the fact that the G5 is a 64 bit processor. It's likely that a future release of the OS will make the hardware faster for some applications by taking advantage of 64 bit processing without requiring a hardware upgrade.
 
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