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Is Mac part of the nix family?

 
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I noticed that it uses the same commands in console...
 
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Mac OS X is based on BSD UNIX with a Mach microkernel. The filesystem layout is fairly non-standard, but yes, absolutely, OS X is in the UNIX family.
 
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PS: I was new to Mac/Unix, so I picked up The Mac OS X Command Line: Unix Under the Hood by Kirk McElhearn. This is a good Mac-flavored introduction.
 
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My story: my room-mate is a desginer and so has been a Mac-head for years. Back in the 2000 time-frame he tried and tried to get me interested in Macs when they were running OS 9. Even though I was impressed by the Mac hardware, and to some extent by OS 9, as a geek-a-zoid I just couldn't wrap my mind around an OS where you had to tell apps how much memory they could use.

Fast forward to 2001 and the introduction of OS X. A unix on Apple hardware? With Apple engineering behind it? With Apple usuability?

I sat in front of the beta of OS X, brought up a Terminal window, and started typing unix commands.

My PC has been unplugged and in the closet ever since.
 
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Timothy,

You should check out: DarwinPorts

Really amazing stuff!

Cheers,
 
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Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:

Fast forward to 2001 and the introduction of OS X. A unix on Apple hardware? With Apple engineering behind it? With Apple usuability?

I sat in front of the beta of OS X, brought up a Terminal window, and started typing unix commands.

My PC has been unplugged and in the closet ever since.




Completely agree with this.

As a Java developer, my day-to-day work is cross-platform anyway. But I'm always running into Linux... which makes it more desirable to work with a *nix platform at the CLI level for my projects.

Add the superior Aqua GUI and multitasking capabilities of BSD, and there's really no point in doing anything in Windows unless you're a .Net developer.
[ September 29, 2005: Message edited by: Robert Hayes ]
 
marc weber
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Originally posted by Robert Hayes:
...there's really no point in doing anything in Windows unless you're a .Net developer.


I entered the Mac realm on April 29 (Tiger's release date), when I replaced my IBM notebook with a Mac PowerBook.

Windows has taught us to expect (indeed, accept) problems with virtually everything we try to do, so despite Mac's "just works" reputation, I fully expected a difficult transition -- or at least a significant learning curve. So the laptop was my "pilot," and I thought that if all went well, I might replace my Windows XP desktop with a Mac in a year or so.

Working with the PowerBook, I realized almost immediately that I wouldn't be able to tolerate another year with my Windows machine. So I started putting aside the money, and 2 days ago I bought an iMac.

Now, what's a person to do with a Pentium box? I'm tempted to experiment with Linux, although I don't think I'm enough of a geek-a-zoid to get very far. It seems that those of us who are not full-fledged zoids have only 2 options: Windows or Mac. And unlike Bear, I don't have the closet space to store PCs, so I suspect my parents are about to get another Dell.
 
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Use your PC to test your Java applications...

Also, use your PC, if you want to play video games...

In my humble opinion, its best to have both OSs (WinXP & OS X) because as software developers, its in our best interest to see all types of applications (how they are built, user interface design, etc.) that are out there. Exposure is good.

Also, M$ released a RDP client that works really well with OS X. I always login to my WinXP machine from OS X using the particular RDP.

Just my two cents...

Cheers,
 
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