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To AJax Junkie: Brett McLaughlin  RSS feed

 
David Dong
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Dear Brett McLaughlin,

What is the time can be save per request with AJAX/XML?


What is the overhead with javascript/HTML/XML if we are not using AJAX?

Thank you,
David
[ April 28, 2006: Message edited by: David Dong ]
 
Lasse Koskela
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Originally posted by David Dong:
Dear Brett McLaughlin,

I'm not Brett, but I'll take a stab at your questions if you don't mind...

Originally posted by David Dong:
What is the time can be save per request with AJAX/XML?

It's not that simple. The use of AJAX does not save any time per request. It's suitable use of AJAX that can improve your web application's user-perceived performance and overall snappiness. In other words, if your application doesn't have the need for asynchronous requests that potentially affect only a small portion of the loaded web page, you might not have a reason to use AJAX.

Originally posted by David Dong:
What is the overhead with javascript/HTML/XML if we are not using AJAX?

I have to say I don't understand your last question. AJAX is JavaScript, HTML, and XML.
 
David Dong
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Hi Everyone,

It is not simple but we can derive a formula such as E=MC square at least.

Let's consider this scenario:
An average webpage that contains images and form data and etc..
Only 50% needs server to refresh and other is not dynamic.

What will be the amount of time can be save for this scenario?
If I miss anything, please add to the scenario.

Thanks,
David
 
Eric Pascarello
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To add my 2 cents:

Okay now Ajax can reduce traffic and increase traffic. It really depends on the Application.

Now with a webpage, all images and external scripts are cached to the user's machine. So they only get downloaded once. From then on the browser uses these cached files when requested. So you do not save there.

You do save in rendering time of the rest of the page.

The general rule of thumb is this:

If you are replacing a functionality that you normally do with a traditional postback. (AKA replacing a double combination with Ajax) you are going to save the user some time with rendering.

If you are adding polling or autocomplete funcitonality, you are going to increase the load on your server.

So it really depends on what you are doing.

Eric
 
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