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Beginning Object-Oriented JavaScript - future

 
Tomasz Prus
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Is it possible that JS will be replaced with something in near future or there are some drawings to improve it? I ask because developers often complain of JS and try avoid it.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Every few months, some technology comes along that claims to be the "JavaScript killer". Never happens.

The triumvirate of (X)HTML/CSS/JavaScript will be with us for a long time.

P.S. People who claim to dislike JavaScript invariably are those that do not understand it. It's actually quite a powerful and interesting language -- especially when you embrace it as a functional language.
 
jim cato
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I would say that I don't fully understand javascript, but I do like the language and use it whenever necessary.

However, the reasons that I dislike it are it's difficulty to use, such as limited development tools and differences in browser implementations. It is fiddly and awkward.

Can you suggest a way around these issues that may ease my headache and encourage me to get a better understanding of the language?

cheers,
Jim
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Originally posted by jim cato:
differences in browser implementations. It is fiddly and awkward.

Are you using a library to insulate you from these differences?
 
jim cato
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No! Perhaps this is where I am going wrong. What library do you recommend? How will this help?

cheers,
Jim
 
Bear Bibeault
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I highly recommend jQuery -- in my opinion, it's the least intrusive of the libraries, yet very powerful.

All of the libraries, to varying extents, allow you to program to single browser-agnostic API and they handle the browser differences under the covers.
 
Bear Bibeault
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For example, here's the code to load a <div> with the results from an Ajax request (passed a single query parameter from an <input> element) in raw JavaScript:


And here's the equivalent code in jQuery:


And that is a fair comparison. In fact, the jQuery code does some error checking that the raw code example does not do.

I know which code I prefer to use.
[ August 26, 2008: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
 
Stoyan Stefanov
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Things happen very quickly on the web and lots of stuff can happen in one or two years. But at the same time, many things stay the same. For example, we still code around IE6 quirks (even IE5.5) and IE6 is a 7 years old browser!

Also there are pages created in the previous century which will likely stay unchanged "forever". Browser vendors cannot afford major backward compatibility breakage, so it's very likely that JS will live at least as long as the web as we know it does. JS is also used on the server, and on the desktop (windows scripting host, firefox extensions, etc)

there are different developments on the future JS front. Most recently, an attempt to make JS more like Java seems to have failed in favor of less radical approach. Some history of the JS future here
 
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