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Making XML "go".

 
Greenhorn
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One of the people in another post said XML needs a parser and a rendering engine. Is the parser and rendering engine something that is part of a browser's source code? Or is it a plug-in to the browser?
Also, where does the Style Sheet come into play with the parser and renderer?
 
Sheriff
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Internet Explorer ( 5.5 and above ) has built-in XML support. So I guess it does have a built in parser.
Stylesheets are used to render XML data. You feed an XML document and a XSL stylesheet to an XSLT engine. The engine produces the output, which is usually a renderable format like XHTML or text etc.
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Ajith Kallambella M.
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java�2 Platform.
 
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Ajith
What about Netscape?Do they have inbuilt xml suppoerter?
 
Sheriff
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I feel quite strongly that XML parsing and transformation in the browser is just a gimmick. Browsers are already far too bloated with support for all sorts of formats. Use XML for data transfer, storage and representation, then transform it on the server into whatever format is "native" to the requesting client. The requesting client may be a HTML browser, a WAP phone, a text viewer, or a custom client.
 
Greenhorn
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I've really only been able to think of one situation where browser-side transformation makes sense, and that's when there's a set of data that the client may wish to view different ways. Since the browser will (should) cache the XML document when it comes down, displaying a different view of that data would only require a download of a new stylesheet, rather than requiring the entire data set to be downloaded again. In my opinion, the "native" support for XML in IE5 is just a toy, really - to move any usable content to a client, it ultimately needs to wind up in some rich presentation format the client understands, such as HTML or WML. And, as Frank says, this is typically done by styling the XML on the server with an XSLT stylesheet.
- Kevin
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Kevin Williams
Senior System Architect, Equient Corporation
author of: Professional XML Databases
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