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Xerces, Oracle or Sun TR2

 
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Which parser is recommended for basic e-com application handling user registration and sign-in and passing on such information to partner sites?
Would appreciate an answer?
Yes'm, I showr woooould!
Jay
 
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Or none of the above.
Brett McLaughlin says (http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-11-2000/jw-1110-validation3_p.html)
The key to the entire schemaParser class is being able to (no surprise here) actually parse an XML schema. Many XML parsers, such as Apache Xerces, currently offer options for schema validation; however, you do not want to use those facilities. In fact, you don't want the XML schema to be handled as a schema at all. That is because all parsers, at least in their current versions, use vendor-specific structures for handling XML schemas. The result is nonportable code, the enemy of any Java programmer.
Instead, the schemaParser class can rely on the fact that an XML schema document is actually an XML document as well. It conforms to XML's well-formedness rules and, therefore, can be treated as any other XML document. Therefore, the schema parser can read in the XML schema as an XML document and operate on it as it would any other document with which it works. That is exactly what the parseschema() method does.
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What say the gurus of JavaRanch?
Jay
 
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I would think, that in the presence of an XML document and a corresponding XML Schema, one should parse the schema with the validation turned off, and the XML document with the validation turned on.

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Ajith Kallambella M.
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java�2 Platform.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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