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Viewing XML

 
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I have created xml, xmlschema and xsl files. Is there any way out to view this xml file in other than IE 5.0. And what parser does, is it converts xml to html, can anybody explain me. What is the best book for XML.
Thanks in advance and regards,
[This message has been edited by V Srinivasan (edited March 20, 2001).]
 
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I have created xml, xmlschema and xsl files. Is there any way out to view this xml file in other than IE 5.0.
As far as my knowledge goes, schema is a tool for validation, not for presentation. Even more, becaue of perfomance reason you shoul not use DTD/schema during the presentation, unless you want to make use of default values. If I am wrong, please, correct me.
And what parser does, is it converts xml to html, can anybody explain me.
Two XML gurus on �parser definition� :
Frank Carver:
�I find that the simplest way to think of a parser is as a data-loader. It reads an external representation of an XML document and transforms it into some sort of in-memory representation.�
Ajith Kallambella: �A parser is a piece of software that "walks through" your XML. All parsers check for well-formedness. Some of them even checks structural integrity. Most importantly a parser will allow you to plug in programming logic so that you can look at the XML data and do some useful stuff. Currently there are XML parsers available in many popular langaguages - C++, Java, Perl etc. You will need a parser if you intend to do XML processing, not just rendering the XML content in a fancy format.�
If all you want is to SHOW your XML, you need an XSLT engine (
Xalan, for example), which will convert your XML into some specified format (most typically HTML).
If you want always show the same XML data, in other words, perform presentation statically, you can convert XML into HTML once by caling
Xalan from command line on your local computer and then publish resulting HTML. If you need dynamical publishing, for example, you need to show only a part of XML data, or show them sorted in user-specified order, than you need Xalan run-time call from your HTML page. It is more complicated task, you can use JSP, particularly, use already defined JSP tags. XSL taglib has �apply� tag for this purpose.
What is the best book for XML
There is no such thing as �the best book for XML�, because evaluation depends on too many factors:
1) what you are up to with XML
2) what is your IT background: begenners and experienced IT professionals may find different books particularly useful, although most of books seems are written to incorporate all range of expertise;
3) on what part of XML learning curve you currently are;
4) what is your thinking style;
5) ...
For genuine beginnners �Visual� series may be a good choice. But I am not a true beginner, hope you already figured out that I am damn sophisticated developer so my advice maybe be all wrong.
Since you asked about schema and parsers, I assume that you are not a beginner. Then any books which give a good overview will be useful
XML bible,
Beginning XML,
Professional XML...
 
V Srinivasan
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Thanks Rita for your elaborated post.
Of course, I am a beginner.
What I understand is
DTD/XMLSchema : Elements are defined
XML : Elements are used really
CSS/XSL : To add flavours to Elements
DOM : Through which we are calling desired Elements for presenting in the Browser.
Is my understanding right? Please correct me wherever I am wrong.
 
Mapraputa Is
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Srinivasan? Is it your name? A little confused how to call you... You seems to be a sophisticated beginner . And XML is a pretty new technology, so we all here are only beginners...
Your understanding is right, only few comments.
CSS : To add flavours to Elements - right,
XSL: To add flavours to Elements + to select certain elements/attributes to be presented. We can have XML document with, say, 20 elements, and have XSL which selects 5 of them. Then as a result of processing XML with XSL stylesheet we will see not 20, but only 5 elements.
DOM : Through which we are calling desired Elements for presenting in the Browser. Yes, it is one possible scenario. Two extentions:
- we cal not only call/read element content and attributes, but also modify, delete or add new ones;
- DOM is an interface, defined in W3C documents. We can work with its implementation on client-side using browser�s DOM implementation. 5th versions of both browsers, IE and NN, support DOM. Of course, each has its own peculiarities, as usual So unless we are sure that all our clients use the same browser, we should probably consider working with DOM inplementation on server side. Then we can forget about browsers and use some parser to get access to DOM functions.
 
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