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JDOM rules, Why use anything else?

 
Andrew Shafer
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I not exactly an XML master, but I can usually beat it into submission with a little effort.
After using JDOM for a just a bit, why would you want to use anything else?
You can use DOM and SAX as input and generate DOM documents and SAX events as output all using a nice slick Java centric API.
Its speed and resource overhead are closer to a SAX approach with every possible benifit of DOM, so why say no?
If anyone has any real reasons, please do tell.
 
Varek Boettcher
Greenhorn
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Hi,
I'm not an "XML master" either but my first response would be from a business practices perspective... I'm not going to rely on api libraries that are still in beta for my production code - period.
I realize you were probably looking for more of a technical discussion but I think the current release state is an important consideration.
Still hoping to see a technical discussion on this topic tho...
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Varek Boettcher
 
Andrew Shafer
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And all those extra lines of code will thank you for it.
Use whatever you want but I think Jason Hunter's Beta releases are probably on par with many people's final release. I'm sure it will only get better, but it works great now and a final release is only a matter of time.
 
Ajith Kallambella
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If you want to be picky( like me here are some not-so-good things about JDOM -

  • JDOM currently doesnot support XPath( though they are working on it )
  • Support for entities and entity references is still flaky in JDOM
  • The core API has intentionally been left thread unsafe. In other words, there are no synchronized blocks within org.jdom.
  • Performance can be a real concern whilst using JDOM with large documents because of additional overhead of creating and maintaining the Collections.

  • If you are interested in learning more about pending issues, checkout their To Do list

    Despite these shortcomings, JDOM was accepted today by the Java Community Process (JCP) as a Java Specification Request (JSR-102). Members of the JCP Executive Committee supporting the effort include Apache, Borland, Caldera, Cisco, HP, IBM, and Sun. So your're right, once these issues are taken care of, JDOM will probably rule the world!
    Cheers!
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    Ajith Kallambella M.
    Sun Certified Programmer for the Java�2 Platform.
    IBM Certified Developer - XML and Related Technologies, V1.
 
Andrew Shafer
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It's fun for the whole family
 
Sylvia Allen
Greenhorn
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Well, then, since it's going to rule the world, I suppose I'd better get on it. Ajith's list of XML resources was very helpful. Where can I learn more specifically about DOM?
- SA

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Sylvia Allen
sylviaa@sirius.com
 
Sylvia Allen
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Whoops--my sig was outdated. Not that I need a reply offline particularly, but if you do send me one the correct address is:
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Sylvia Allen
sylviaa@screaminet.com
 
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