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Question for Scott Bain

 
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Hi Scott,
Well I am a developer using Java Extensively. Even though I know XML, am not convinced with the precise usage of it. Means the cases where I can implement it optimally.
To be very frank I am a novice in this area but would love to learn in details.
Vijay
 
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I'll tell you some of the specific areas where I use it -- perhaps that will help.
I use XML to store configurational information for an application. For a server, for instance, I might store its IP address, root folder, handler application paths, etc...
I use XML to communicate over a network connection. For example, one of my clients needs to send complex information between an AS/400 and a Java application, using sockets. We structure this information in XML.
I use XML (via SOAP or XML-RPC) to create distributed objects, to make method calls to remote objects over a TCP/IP connection.
I use XML to control a project (the CDROM mentioned above). The slides, audio files, video components, etc... are all managed by an XML structure that defines what audio goes with what file, etc... then I use XSLT to translate this into a catalog page, javascript arrays for the actual tool, etc... If I need to move a slide, add a video clip, whatever, I just change the XML and re-run the transformations.
These are just some examples. As has been said elsewhere in this forum, XML is not a magic bullet, but a useful tool. I don't mark up huge amounts of data with it (I have not found a need for this). I use it primarily as a way to communicate between processes, and to control various activities within a process.
HTH
 
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I'd like to share my experience of using XML too.
I use XML as parameters of called methods. Even we pack a resultset into one XML. It works fine.
I use XML as intermediate data format. In a EDI project, we assemble XML, then validate it, transform it and exchange it among applications. XML does bring us facility in programming. Because there is no XML-EDI standard, we send our data to business partners using traditional EDI format.
Many applications such as servlet engine, ejb server, using XML as configuration tools. In our applications, we use XML to replace the dated ini files.
The most excited thing XML brings to us is regarding distributed objects. That is SOAP and Web Services which are based on XML. I think SOAP and Web services are lightweight solutions to distributed objects. We can make method calls to remote objects, but we need not to install something like ORB on every client. (Scott, am i right?
)
I am looking forward to ebXML, which will definitely change the whole business mode.

Doug.
 
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I would like to chip in that I hack WAP/WML applications just for the fun of it. I use Nokia's WAP Toolkit. BTW, is WAP/WML "dead"?
Ex Animo Java!
-- Val
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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