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Comparison to "Java Tools" book?

 
Richard Jensen
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Sorry if this has been addressed elsewhere, but how does the Cookbook differ from the Hightower/Lesiecki book "Java Tools for Extreme Programming?" Is it a different focus? A different level of detail about the tools?
I generally like books put out by O'Reilly, but I already have the Hightower book and am wondering if there will be enough new material to warrant adding it to my bookshelf.
Thanks.
 
Brian Coyner
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Our book contains very focused "recipes" on how to accomplish certain tasks with various tools. For example, do you want to know how to test form parameters using Cactus? Our book has a recipe. Perhaps you want to know how to test event notifications in Swing? Our chapter on Mock Objects shows how.
Some of our chapters delve into why you would want to use a certain tool, and when a tool is overkill.
Our book also shows how to properly setup a robust Ant build environment for each tool. For example, do you want to setup XDoclet to generate EJB-specific files? We show you how. Perhaps you want to setup your Ant buildfile to start and stop Tomcat, deploy and undeploy, and run Cactus tests? We show you how to do this, too.
I have read the "orange" book and it's pretty good. I think the books compliment each other, and should be on every Java programmer's desk.
 
Richard Jensen
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Originally posted by Brian Coyner:
Our book contains very focused "recipes" on how to accomplish certain tasks with various tools. For example, do you want to know how to test form parameters using Cactus? Our book has a recipe. Perhaps you want to know how to test event notifications in Swing? Our chapter on Mock Objects shows how.
...
I have read the "orange" book and it's pretty good. I think the books compliment each other, and should be on every Java programmer's desk.

Thanks for the reply. This sounds like a great approach (and would have probably saved me some time when I was first getting familiar with these tools). I'll drop by the local B&N and check it out!
 
Erik Hatcher
Author
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Don't forget about our book as a contender in this category. We cover most of the same tools, from an Ant-centric manner. Our sample build files from Manning's site and from my JavaDevWithAnt project. Our book covers Continuous Integration (CruiseControl, Anthill, Gump), XDoclet, Cactus, and much more. There is certainly room for all of these books on our bookshelves, though - but unfortunately our budgets aren't always that big. Choose your books carefully!
 
Guillermo Castro
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I will search this book the next time I go to the U.S. For an experienced programmer, sometimes what you need is particular examples to do specific things, not whole chapters on how things work. I bought some years ago the Perl Cookbook, and it has been one of the best Perl books I have with me, and I still look at it.
 
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