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Agility and Discipline Made Easy: Only a RUP book?

 
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Welcome to the Saloon Per and Bruce,

is the book about software process in general or do you follow mainly the RUP software process?

It's not that clear to me, because your subtitle hints that the book is about RUP. However reading Amazon.com reader's comments, then the book talks about design principles and best practice which can be valid for any other software process.

What about examples, I think of a whole software process life cycle beginning from a requirement specification to the deployment.

Do you cover such a life cycle in your book by applying your principles and best practices to it?

Regards,
Darya
[ September 26, 2006: Message edited by: Darya Akbari ]
 
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Darya,

thanks for the welcome to the saloon!

There is (almost) nothing specific about RUP in the book. Most people that people in agile and iterative development would hopefully agree with the practices in the book. You can apply these practices and use for example Scrum. However, we did not want to avoid the fact that Bruce and I have a long background as key drivers of RUP, and now the open source process OpenUP (see www.eclipse.org/epf). The practices in the book are very consistent with what we have in RUP and OpenUP, but as we clarify in the book, they are also very consistent with thinking in Scrum, XP, Adptive Development, Agile Modeling, etc. In fact, for each practice, we comment on how it relates to other processes, especially XP and Scrum. In some cases we articulate practices not covered by scrum, in other cases we have a different view that XP, but all practices are written process independent.

Regarding your question on whether we describe a lifecycle. Not really. We do cover briefly the 4 phases in Unified Process (Inception, Elaboration, Construction, Transition), and how they influence various practices, but we do not describe an end-to-end process.

Cheers

/Per
 
Darya Akbari
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Hi Per,

would I be right when I say that your book is more a collection of wisdoms or ingredients useful for all software processes, not only RUP .

Regards,
Darya
 
Per Kroll
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Darya,

I think that is a true statement, it articulates practices we have seen work over the years, and many of them are consistent with many different agile processes. And we do absolutely not claim to be the 'inventors' of these, most stuff has been known to work for some time, but are not adopted as widely as we would like them to be....

Cheers

/Per
 
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