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innovation games: can it relate to writing use cases?

 
Gian Franco
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Hello,

My first impression is that this book covers the requirements stage of software development.

Does it relate, or can you relate your games with something like writing
use cases?


Kind regards,

Gian
 
Luke Hohmann
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Gian -
I tend to think of invention as "science in the lab", innovation as "applying something novel to solving a problem", and requirements as "shapping that novel application into something that will result in a sustainably profitable solution.".

When considered this way, the foundation of innovation is understanding the problem. This is what Innovation Games does very well -- they help you understand the various problems your customers are trying to solve. Armed with this understanding, you can use a variety of requirements management techniques to document them for your team.

Use cases, of course, are a great technique for documenting many different kinds of requirements. Andy Pols has done some interesting work in relating some of the games to requirements, most notably Product Box. Product Box is very effective at helping you understand the goals of your actors, as they often write these goals directly on their boxes. Another game that is very effective in developing use cases is Spider Web, as this game can help you uncover additional actors that should be included in the overall solution.

Does that help?
 
Gian Franco
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Yes it helps, thanks.

I misinterpreted innovation in that context and related it to innovative aspects of the product itself, that is innovation for reasons of product differentiation, like you see in other products. Take cornflakes for example (I can't come up with another example now), cornflakes are fine by itself, but you've got flavoured ones, low fat, kid's cornflakes, etc. etc.

Cheers,

Gian
[ October 31, 2006: Message edited by: Gian Franco Casula ]
 
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