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What to do with a spare computer

 
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Hi all,
I have a question that i hope someone can help me with. I recently bought a spanking new Dell pc with XP and all the tricks, however once i deleted a lot of the stuff that my old computer had on it, it now seems to run fine but i don't know what to do with it. I don't obviously want to throw it out as its still quite good and was thinking about either networking it up to my Dell or installing Linux or something. Is it possible to network Windows 98 to Windows XP and if so how??? Or would i be better clearing it out and installing Linux on it and learning about that instead (which is what i feel i should do to learn it), but if so where is the best place to learn about Linux (i know zero about it). I want to do something useful with it but im not sure how to go about it.
Any help or ideas would be great
Thanks
Sam
 
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If you want to learn Linux, put Linux on it. Either way, Linux or 98, networking with XP should not be a problem. There are countless books on Linux, and of course there is linux.org. If you already have any exprerience with Unix, then Linux will be easy to pick up. To fully understand Linux, you will need to do a lot of command line stuff in a shell.
 
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Just in case I wind up in the same position - any recommendations on multi-boot options to put Win and Linux on one machine? Do Win or Linux come with good boot managers?
 
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I have Red Hat Linux 8 and Windows XP installed on my old machine and use the GRUB bootloader that comes with RedHat - this allows me to choose between the two OS's when the machine powers up and does the job fine for me (for free).
 
Michael Morris
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Just in case I wind up in the same position - any recommendations on multi-boot options to put Win and Linux on one machine? Do Win or Linux come with good boot managers?
Like Damian said, just use the native loader that comes with Linux. There can be some sticky issues with certain versions of Windows, especially NT because of partioning constraints on that OS. If you are using any NT kernel OS (NT, 2K or XP), and if you use an NTFS file system, the best way to proceed is to create a FAT32 for it first and once you have both OS's running OK, then convert the FAT32 to NTFS. The Linux installation seems to get confused when it sees an NTFS file system.
 
Sam Tilley
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Thanks Michael and guys,
If i can install Linux onto my Windows XP computer and run either or i might do that instead (it will save changing stuff around all the time) and leave my other PC to do other stuff with when i work out what (maybe just network it instead). Apart from Linux.org and redhat are there any sites that anyone can recommend for a real starter, Linux for dummies kinda thing
Thanks
 
Damian Ryan
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Try these:
Linux for Newbies
Linux Documentation Project
Linux Planet
Linux Headquarters
 
Sam Tilley
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Thanks Damian
 
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