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J2EE vs. PHP

 
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I was reading This article that says "There are high-end application development projects that only J2EE can solve." What does "high-end" mean?

I have often wondered why certain web projects are done using J2EE. I can understand NASA using J2EE when they need to do something complex, but most of the applications that I have seen just read and write to a database. Do you get the impression that a lot of e-commerce applications could be created much more quickly by using something more simple like PHP?

Is there some place on the net that explains when to use certain technologies?
 
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PHP is very similar to JSP 0.9.
It's an unmaintainable mess that invites (if not actually forcing) spaghetti code and cut&paste programming.

Not at all a good way to write enterprise applications.

I agree that for very small things and prototypes it may sometimes be faster, but as those tend to grow and grow and be put in production instead of the applications they're prototypes for it's not a good idea to cut corners on even them.
 
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PHP is a useful technology in the right situations - but I'd argue its not comparable with J2EE.

The "high end" applications you refer to need so much more in the way of what you could call infastructrue functionality - clustering, internationalization, transaction management, asynchronous processing, a security model, etc. which either is not provided by PHP, or is provided in too poorly implemented a way for it to be used.

Here's an example of why you might consider one of the J2EE technologies over PHP: support of character sets. If you are writing a web application you can reasonably expect users of different langauges using it, and that implies all the attendent problems of supporting multiple character sets. PHP unfortunately casually ignores the existance of characters sets other than ASCII, using a byte to store characters, which negates the posibility of using Unicode.

Thats only one reason, but thats the sort of thing you might be thinking of if you choose a J2EE technology over PHP.

I personally think PHP is a fine way of producing quick intranet sites (its is directly comparable with old-fashioned ASP and ColdFusion in that respect), but beyond that its too limited to use for anything of any real size.
 
Rick Portugal
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Thanks for that information.

Is there a book that lists technologies and what their advantages and disadvantages are? How does an architect or a CIO know when J2EE should be used and when PHP should be used? What are the strengths and weaknesses of Lua or Ruby or MySQL? Is this kind of information out on the net someplace?
 
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my systems analysis book said that a list of possible plans with their good and bad points is created. one plan gets chosen.

im sure that sometimes a bad choice is made. i think of a program i wrote in VB that gathered data in real time through the serial port. it would have been harder to write in java, but even worse, i had to do a windows system call to give my program higher priority because it was losing data sometimes. im afraid java's speed would have proved a problem
[ December 21, 2004: Message edited by: Randall Twede ]
 
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