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Max RSA key length

 
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Hi,
Does JDK 1.6 support unlimited RSA key size i.e. there is no restriction:
From default_local.policy:
permission javax.crypto.CryptoPermission "RSA", *;

Thanks
Aryan
 
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Why would you want unlimited RSA key lengths?
As lengths get longer, performance gets much worse. 2048 is plenty long for anything today. 4096 is overkill unless you are NSA.
 
Aryan Khan
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Hi Pat,
Sorry I meant to say that with out downloading the unlimited jurisdiction policy files, JDK 6 allows unrestricted RSA key lengths.

And only RSA is allowed as for the rest I still can see the limits in policy file.

Any specific reasons for this?

Thanks
Aryan
 
Pat Farrell
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Originally posted by Aryan Khan:
Any specific reasons for this?



Yes, encryption has long been considered a military item, goes back to Julius Caesar. Many governments don't want strong encryption to be used.

Breaking the enigma code by Brittan in WW2 was considered a major reason that they could survive until the US entered the war. Breaking the Japanese Purple code was also a major part of the war in the Pacific.

The laws have become more reasonable in recent years, but export of strong encryption is regulated in many countries. Use of strong encryption was illegal in a surprisingly large number of countries until recently. I haven't checked today, but it may still be illegal in some.

It is illegal for me, a US citizen in the US to even tell you how to get around the ITAR restrictions that the US places on crypto export.
 
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