• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Thanks Dan Chisholm

 
david wang
Greenhorn
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just passed scjp1.4, score is 80%
I did all Dan's web site question. Thanks Dan.
I should be higher than the score because the first 30 questions are difficult, I am nervous. There are more Collection framework questions and difficult.
A problem is my register name is different from my ID card name, and the address also has error. I must change them, does anyone give me some suggestion?
Once more thanks Dan.
David Cao
[ January 03, 2003: Message edited by: davidaaaaaa wangaaaaaa ]
 
Sarma Lolla
Ranch Hand
Posts: 203
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congratulations on successful completion of JCP1.4.
If you can throw some light on the questions you got that would be really helpful to all of us who are preparing to take this exam.
 
Ambapali Pal
Ranch Hand
Posts: 47
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congratulation .
 
Harry Kong
Ranch Hand
Posts: 41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congrats!
I am guessing you are thanking Dan because his exam questions helped you with your preparation. I have a question for you though. Dan uses a lot of octal and hex numbers. I am not terrible at it, but I am not that fast either. Does the real exam contain many of octal and hex numbers? Thanks for sharing.
 
Jessica Sant
Sheriff
Posts: 4313
Android IntelliJ IDE Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
"davidaaaaaa wangaaaaaa"-
three things...
1st thing:
Welcome to the JavaRanch! Please adjust your displayed name to match the JavaRanch Naming Policy.
You can change it here.
2nd thing:
nicely done on passing the exam.
3rd thing:
I'm moving this to the Sun Certification Results forum. You can continue the congratulations there.
Thanks! and again welcome to the JavaRanch!
 
Ruff Young
Ranch Hand
Posts: 513
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congratulations
 
Dan Chisholm
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1865
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congratulations David!
 
Dan Chisholm
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1865
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Harry Kong:
Congrats!
I am guessing you are thanking Dan because his exam questions helped you with your preparation. I have a question for you though. Dan uses a lot of octal and hex numbers. I am not terrible at it, but I am not that fast either. Does the real exam contain many of octal and hex numbers? Thanks for sharing.

Harry,
Have you tried the following tutorial?
http://www.danchisholm.net/tutorials/baseconvert.html
The real exam does require an understanding of hex and octal but it is not strongly emphasized on the real exam.
Digital computers are binary machines but people prefer not to work with binary because 32 bit binary values are large and inconvenient. People prefer to work with decimal because we have ten fingers and we learned to count using our fingers. Unfortunately, decimal to binary conversions are difficult so decimal is not always a great choice for helping us to move data in and out of a computer. If humans had evolved with only eight fingers then we would probably find it more difficult to play piano; but we would find it much easier to interface with digital computers.
Octal to binary conversions are very easy and people find octal easier to read than binary so octal does a good job of helping us to move data in and out of a computer. When CPUs were small octal was a popular choice.
Any single character octal value can be represented using 3 bits because the eight values 0-7 are easily represented using 3 bits. If a typical CPU were designed to handle 33 bit values then each value could be represented using 11 octal characters. Furthermore, any multiple of 3 bits would easily be represented using octal. If popular CPUs were built to handle 9, 18, or 36 bit values then we would all be using octal today and hexadecimal would be unnecessary.
Today, the size of a typical CPU is a multiple of four bits. Examples are 8, 16, 32, and 64 machines. Four bits represent 16 values so hexidecimal is really a better choice than octal for moving data in and out of typical computer.
I use a lot of octal and hexadecimal on my exams because it is very easy to represent what is happening inside a computer using octal and hexadecimal. That's why those systems are so popular today.
Hexadecimal makes it easier for humans to work with computers so it is not something that you should avoid.
 
Harry Kong
Ranch Hand
Posts: 41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Dan for the information. I am not bad at it. It's just that this is something I learned in freshman in college and I am a bit rusty things are coming back to me quite nicely, thanks to you Dan (for the mock exams)
 
Manish Hatwalne
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2596
Android Firefox Browser Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congrats David!
- Manish
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic