Win a copy of The Little Book of Impediments (e-book only) this week in the Agile and Other Processes forum!
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cleared the SCJP 1.4 hurdle today

 
Geoff Boushey
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Hi,

This is my first post, though I benefitted greatly from this site and discussion as I prepared for the exam. Just wanted to share some of my thoughts and advice on taking this exam.

For starters, I want to say that it isn't an easy test. I'd been programming in Java for a couple of years, and I needed to do very substantial review before taking the exam. It turned out to be a worthwhile effort. If you find you are writing the same code over and over, you may not be getting the chance to learn about other aspects of Java. The exam forces you to spend time reading broadly in the language. Passing the test is the main purpose of studying, of course, but you may also find better ways of doing things that you hadn't thought about for a while.

I used the same study materials that a lot of other people on this board have used - Kathy and Bert's book, Marcus Green's exams, the Rules Roundup, etc... this covers all the bases, and is very good study material. The only other bit of advice I can offer is to open up a terminal window and write code as much as possible. On several occasions while reading K&B, I had had questions that weren't answered in the text. My advice is don't guess, write some code - the compiler and jvm will answer any question you have. Another helpful technique is to try to think up some questions for yourself, and solve them without looking at the book. It's just too easy to overlook something when it's already there on the page. When you start thinking of what's tricky about threads and devise some questions to get at it, you're thinking like the test writers. This will also help you connect with the material - you may know in the abstract that you need to throw an exception in a particular method, but there's nothing quite like puzzling over a compiler error to really drill it into your head. I also noticed that I become much better at knowing when there would be a runtime error, exception, or compiler error after writing code.

Anyway, my advice is to find a way to connect with the material as much as possible. If this had been an empty exercise just to pass a test, it would have been a lot harder to stick with it.

Best of luck.
- Geoff
 
Tong Chen
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congratulations!
 
Ravi Goli
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Hi Geoff,
Congratulations!

Those were really some good suggestions from U.

All the Best.
Ravi
 
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