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Product Certification and Job Rotation

 
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Hi,
I have lot's of experience in J2EE and Weblogic, though I do not have a single certification !
I work for a Consulting Company who provides custom SW solutions to different business. In my Company, I do not face any problem, even though I do not have a certification.
I do not have aspirations to work with Weblogic throughout. As a part of Company policy of Job Rotation, the next project I work in might be in Websphere or Oracle 9iAS, or even in some other language ( like C !). I do not plan to remain as a developer for a long time either. I plan to get promoted to management positions, perhaps after 6 - 7 years. Right now, I write less code and manage more, being a project leader. How would a product certification help me in the long run?
 
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Well, just my two cents, but I thought I'd answer, since I saw no one had answered here.
For my own purposes, I think that the certification really depends on what you're trying to show by obtaining one. Certifications do show familiarity and skill in a specific field (such as WebLogic 7.0) and are useful for distinguishing yourself from other folks in the same concept-space. BUT, they're also useful as a means to show general knowledge (I would assume, for instance, someone certified as a WebLogic developer could probably write J2EE applications for nearly any application server with a short learning curve - maybe not administrate said server, but develop for it) and to illustrate a willingness to keep up with programming trends and an eagerness to continue learning.
In the position of management, a certification can show familiarity with a technology, and give you a leg-up not only with clients, but with your subordinate developers as a mentor. Just because you're not necessarily a developer at a given point doesn't mean you're useless in the development process.
In the end, it's really a matter of how you choose to see the value of the piece of paper.
 
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