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Serving XML data on web

 
ZEESHAN AZIZ
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Assume that relational database data will be served to a web site in HTML format, and that no other rendering or integration needs are known.
Which of the following is the MOST likely reason a developer might choose XML as an intermediate step for this process?
a) The XML path is faster and more efficient than other web data delivery implementations.
b) The XML may be served directly to the web client in future releases.
c) The tools for producing XML are more available and easier to use than other web data delivery technologies.
d) The relational database is likely to already output its data in XML format.
I think answer to above question should be B. I would like to seek your opinion on it?
 
Danl Thompson
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So you would go through all of the trouble of building an XML middle tier just because it might be supported in the client in the future?
 
lydia westland
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I agree with ZEESHAN. first of all, the other answers seem not as good as B. what's more, whether a product has many future support is a big strategic issues in architecture design. we can use all kinds of existing tools if browser supports XML in the future.
 
Syed AliRaza Zaidi
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Yeah Surely its B seems good and sounds good
 
Danl Thompson
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Stop calling me Shirley
 
Danl Thompson
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Our concensus at work is C. Even Shirley agrees with me. But now I've got to prove myself! OK give me a few days, and we'll see what I can come up with for this.
We all agree, that you would never design a system to take advantage of some feature that "might" (or might not) be available in the future.
Dan'l
 
Mapraputa Is
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Apparently the IBM's answer is b. Check this link.
 
Danl Thompson
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And tell me, why should I believe that web site's opinions about the right answer? They do serve up a tastey pop-up ad, but that's about all.
 
Mapraputa Is
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1) feeding IBM141 mock exam machine with these answers returns 100% score 2) it's partly the result of JR collective brain. tastey pop-up ads are inevitable evil, I supose
 
Rakesh Gudur
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Hai all,
Answer d also seems appropriate, because the database itself could give the results in XML format which is readable and structured and hence it is used.
Thanks,
Rakesh.
Nothing is good or bad, but thinking makes it so.
 
Danl Thompson
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Well, then the mock test is wrong isn't it?
 
srinivasan ganesan
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This is what I meant by questions that have ambiguous answers but (b)makes (more) sense to me too...
Srini
 
Danl Thompson
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I guess the problem is that all my friends and I are a bunch of old farts that have been in the business for 30+ years and we would never, ever, ever in a 1000 years, design something into a system because it MIGHT be supported in the future. Someone has to explain to me the logic in answer B.
 
srinivasan ganesan
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Dan'l,
I think that this question sounds more like something to market XML and/or a reason to believe why we need to go the XML way.
Well, I read an article on CNET.com on how the US govt seeks an accord on XML. It seems like lots and lots of companies are creating their own DTDs and schemas which makes it difficult for 2 or more companies to exchange their documents because they don't follow the industry standard or that they don't comply with the Industry-wide DTD/schema. I'm giving you an example of how fast XML & its related technologies are being adopted in a wide variety of Industries.
I'm not an expert in XML nor am I claiming to be one but from what I have heard/read, I won't be surprised if XML replaces HTML in the presentation of data amongst its many other uses.
I don't have 30+ years of IT experience. So, I know that I can't convince you to believe that this will be the case in the future but as I said, with it's current popularity, I'd have to go with (b).
Srini
 
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