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Axis JAX-RPC vs JWSDP JAX-RPC

 
Mudunuri Raju
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Hi,

What is the selection criteria for developing a web services frame work.
1. Axis - Jax-RPC (OR)
2. Sun - Jax-RPC

I am totally confused, which one to use. I found Axis is much easier to develop and deploy. But this is not a selection criteria to choose a frame work.

Any performance related issues with Axis?. Please advice.

Please advise me to choose which one is better than the other.

Appreciate the help

-- Srinivas
SCJP, SCJD, SCEA1, SCBCD, Weblogic 7.0
 
Peer Reynders
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I cannot give you answer as your question is way to open-ended. But here are some observations.
  • JAX-RPC (JAX-WS) Java API for XML-Based RPC (Web services) is an API that typically builds on top of SAAJ - but its not a full-blown "Web services framework".
  • Anything claiming to support JAX-RPC must support exactly the same functionality as specified by the JAX-RPC (JAX-WS) specification. As to JAX-RPC performance you would have to identify which implementation versions you are looking at i.e. JWSDP 1.0 - 2.0, Axis 1.1, 1.2, 2.0; their implementations are constantly evolving (not that I could give you an answer if you knew the versions).
  • JWSDP is not supposed to be used in a production environment. It's merely a reference implementation that shows how web services will be supported under application servers that implement J2EE or future Java EE specifications (e.g. Sun Application Server, Weblogic, Websphere, Oracle Application Server, etc.). It also demonstrates an entire collection of technologies that are collectively referred to as "J2EE Web Services".
  • Axis does not implement the full set of "J2EE Web service" technologies - its more like a "Java Web Services+" which seems to be sufficient for many applications at the moment.

  • You can't make an educated choice unless you know what your requirements are. If you need to operate in a J2EE environment Java BluePrints: Designing Web Services with the J2EE 1.4 Platform may be a good place to find out which technologies are needed to satisfy your requirements - once you have a list of desired/required technologies you can select a suitable Web service platform.
     
    Mudunuri Raju
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    Thanks Peer. Happy with your answers. Appreciate the help.

    -- Srinivas
     
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