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Questions from RMH

 
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Hello guys,
While reading the RMH book, I had the following questions. As always, any help is greatly appreciated.

1) In the RMH book, under Section 22.3 (Deploying JSEs), it was mentioned at one place that :

QUOTED : "Although the contents of the root and its subdirectories are accessible as URLs (once they're deployed), the contents of the META-INF and WEB-INF subdirectories are not publicly accessible�they may be accessed only by the container system and the Web components themselves."

In the next para, it was also mentioned that

QUOTED : "The WSDL documents, in this case bookquote.wsdl, are placed in the WEB-INF/wsdl subdirectory. At runtime, the wsdl directory can be accessible to Web service clients directly. For example, you could access the bookquote.wsdl at
http://www.Monson-Haefel.com/jwsbook/wsdl/bookquote.wsdl."

Arent the above two statements contradicting each other ? How can the clients that are outside the container have access to a WSDL document stored inside a WEB-INF folder of the web application using a direct URL ?

2) Under Section 22.2.3 (JAX-RPC Mapping Files), it was mentioned :

QUOTED : "Remember that a WSDL document can define several different port and binding definitions that may share a common portType. Without a JAX-RPC mapping file it can be difficult to determine which WSDL port a J2EE endpoint is associated with."

I have always been confused about this statement ? Could anyone please let me know under what situations we would have multiple port and binding definitions sharing a common portType ?

Thanks,
Sonu :roll:
 
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Originally posted by Sonu TheKool:

QUOTED : "Remember that a WSDL document can define several different port and binding definitions that may share a common portType. Without a JAX-RPC mapping file it can be difficult to determine which WSDL port a J2EE endpoint is associated with."

I have always been confused about this statement ? Could anyone please let me know under what situations we would have multiple port and binding definitions sharing a common portType ?



Your portType is like your interface. It describes what the web service can do. The binding defines the operations that are available and the protocol used to access them. It's possible that you can have a web service that has multiple operations, but some are invoked using SOAP/HTTP at one endpoint, and others are invoked using SOAP/JMS at a completely different endpoint. Since you use the binding element to tell the service element how to bind your service to a protocol, if you're using two different transport methods (i.e. SOAP/HTTP and SOAP/JMS) at different endpoints, you'll definitely need two different bindings to describe that.
[ June 15, 2006: Message edited by: Michael Valentino ]
 
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