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digital signature

 
lucy hu
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9. Which of the following security features are provided by digital signatures?
A. Confidentiality
B. Non-repudiation
C. Verifiability
D. Sealing
can anyone please explain why A is not right, and what does D bean? does that mean Message digest?
Lucy
 
Christophe Testi
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Hi Lucy,
Please have a look at http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Interviews/DigitalSigs/
In a few words using a digital signature does not mean that your document is encrypted, it's just a guarantee that your document has not been altered.
-Chris
 
lucy hu
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Confidentiality
Confidentiality is the process of protecting data from unauthorized use or users. Simply put, it means that only the intended recipient of a message can make sense of it. http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-04-2000/jw-0428-security_p.html
 
SJ Adnams
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Chris is right on this one I think
 
capri
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hi
i am looking for some good material in EJB security and design patterns
can you pls suggest where i can ...
 
Rufus BugleWeed
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I believe sealing means the content has not been altered and nothing has been added to it. The idea comes from sealing an envelope and posting it.
 
Douglas Kent
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For security, "Beginning Java Networking" from WROX (Chad Darby, et al) will give you everything you need and then some. On design patterns, there's no better than to take a deep breath, and plunge into the classic "Design Patterns" from the GoF (skip the first part, tho.) Here's another...The Design Patterns Java Companion
Regards,
Doug (SCEA part one, complete)
 
Chris Mathews
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I agree with you advice of reading Design Patterns. But I disagree on your advice on skipping the first part. The first chapter is one of the best pieces ever written on OOP. Definitely a must read.
 
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