Win a copy of The Little Book of Impediments (e-book only) this week in the Agile and Other Processes forum!
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Java or J2ee client???

 
Harsh Deshpande
Greenhorn
Posts: 16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi All,
For the Travel Agent, the client can be of 2 types. Java Client or
J2EE Client.
In Java Client, all the JNDI look up etc will need to be coded by
the developer.
In J2EE client, JNDI look up is easy. Also, the J2EE client
container provides other benefits like security and other J2EE
goodies. But this will need the installation of J2EE client
container on the client machines.
Which do you think is better for the purpose of the assignment and
why?
I am inclined towards using J2EE client.
Or am I getting into too much detail?
Harsh
 
Thomas Taeger
Ranch Hand
Posts: 311
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Harsh Deshpande:
client can be of 2 types. Java Client or J2EE Client.

Hi Harsh,
where did you find this naming and meaning of "Java Client" and "J2EE Client"?
What I know is:
J2EE-Client can be ...
... by J2EE spec and technology:
- Java Applet:
- - in applet container = browser's JVM
- - uses the UI components of the JVM of the browser
- - connects to web tier / presentation tier
- - J2EE specified
- Java Client Application:
- - "application client container" = JRE of J2SE
- - uses the UI components of the JRE
- - connects to any tier allowed in ACLs' config.
- - J2EE specified
- Rich Client
- - written in any language
- - own UI components
- - connects to any tier allowed in ACLs' config
- - not J2EE specified
- HTML Client / "Web Client" / Thin Client:
- - no container (no Java, no J2EE)
- - uses the UI components of the HTML implementation of the browser
- - connects to WebTier (Servlet, JSP, CGI, ...)
- - Web Browser
- - XML + .xslt
- - Dynamic WebPages (?)
--------
... by tier accessed:
- Web Client
- - a client accessing the WebTier
- - browser ...
- - typically HTML or XML + .xslt
- - via HTTP or HTTPS
- EJB Client
- - a client accessing an Enterprise JavaBean
- - "works on the client tier"
- - accesses one or more EJBs
- - via RMI, using RMI-JRMP or RMI-IIOP
- EIS Client
- - a client accessing an Enterprise Information System
- - uses JCA (J2EE Connector Architecture)
- - uses appropriate APIs
- - uses proprietary protocols
- WebService Peer
- - on the WebTier
- - acts peer-to-peer (not C/S, not N-Tier)
- - acts as client (of other peers) and as well as server (for other peers)
- - typically over HTTP, using ebXML, SOAP, ...
- Multi Tier Client
- - similar to a WebService Peer, but
- - not only on the WebTier
- - accesses components on any tier
- - typically via Java Messaging Server (JMS), asynchroneously


In Java Client, all the JNDI look up etc will need to be coded by the developer.

I agree.

In J2EE client ...

Probably you mean Applet clients and ClientApplications?
Or do you mean one EJB (entity bean) being the client of enother EJB (session bean...)?


In J2EE client, JNDI look up ... will need the installation of J2EE client container on the client machines.

Applet container is installed by having/installing a Java enabled browser.
ApplicationClientContainer is installed by having/installing JRE of J2SE (and probabely Java Web Start).
Did I understand you right?
Thomas.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic