Win a copy of Reactive Streams in Java: Concurrency with RxJava, Reactor, and Akka Streams this week in the Reactive Progamming forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Knute Snortum
  • Tim Cooke
  • Devaka Cooray
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Ganesh Patekar

Vertical Scaling

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I read that Vertical Scaling reduces the Reability ... how it can ?
Is replacing processor for example from
1 Ghz to 2 Ghz is also vertical scaling ?
or Vertical scaling just mean by "adding"
not "replacing" processor and memory..
I know that by adding new processor then
the reability is reduced a bit..
because we have more probability of fail
caused by new added processor (if one
fail, then all of them are fail).
Thx,
Amin
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1551
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These rule of thumbs you state are not 100%.
If your airplane has two motors and one fails
you still have the other.
Going from a 1.2GHz to a 2.0Ghz is vertical
scaling.
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yeah I don't understand also very well..
Vertical:
Achieved by adding capacity (memory, CPUs, etc.) to existing servers.
Requires few to no changes to the architecture of a system.
Increases: Capacity, Manageability
Decreases: Reliability, Availability
How can it reduce reliability and availability,
in my opinion, it remains the same...
Gus Dur
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 42
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
these are the disadvantages of vertical scaling when it is compared to horizontal scaling

Originally posted by Gus Dur:

How can it reduce reliability and availability,
in my opinion, it remains the same...
Gus Dur

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 148
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My $0.02
In that statement, the author does not really imply that VS will reduce Reliability / Scalability, perhaps the way to read it would be that VS will have little / no impact on Reliability and Availability, as compared with HS.
VS, as has been pointed out is achieved by adding processors / memory ...as opposed to HS, where new servers are added.
If you have just changed your server from a 2 processor m/c to a 4 processor m/c, how does that change availability / reliability? In multi-processor systems, the underlying OS is intelligent enough to spread its processing load amongst the processors. However if the disk array crashes, what difference will it make whether there were 2 or 4 processors? None. The m/c is down. Does both reliability and availability threats still exist even after VS.
As opposed to VS, in HS, new machines are added. You also either have specialized applications that can manage load or your software supports some kind of clustering and redundacy. In this example, if one server fails, the redundancy machanism will kick off and the system will continue to be available. Thus HS actually enhances the Reliability / Availability of a system.
HTH.
 
Oh, sure, you could do that. Or you could eat some pie. While reading this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!