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applicability of reading list items on scea links page?

 
Anonymous
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i'm considing purchasing several of the items listed on the reading list given in the scea links page, and am wondering if someone who is close to finishing/has finished part 1 (and who perhaps needed to rely on a fair amount of book-based study) could reply on whether they found particular items on the reading list helpful/needed.
SCEA Links (w/ reading list)
 
Rufus BugleWeed
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Looks like a lot of good material on the list. Many of the titles would be nice additions to your library and your mind.
You don't need to buy any of them to prepare for the exam.
I have recommended against the Gang of 4 patterns book here several times.
I don't see Roberts' and Cade's study guide listed. I could hardly stop reading it when I got my copy. Then again, I only think it is a fair work.
Is money an issue in your life? Which titles are you considering?
 
venkatesh rajmendram
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I think
Cade - Overall
Gang of 4 - Patterns
Ed Roman - EJB
Martin fowler -UML
and lots of common sense - by U
Must be sufficient material. Along with the material you have on links...
I have started preparing, Cade is a good start.
Hope that helps...
- Thanks
Venkatesh
 
Chris Mathews
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Originally posted by venkatesh rajmendram:

Cade - Overall
Gang of 4 - Patterns
Ed Roman - EJB
Martin fowler -UML

Personally, I don't think the Cade book is very useful but I won't dwell on this since I have posted my complete thoughts on it numerous times.
Regardless, Core J2EE Patterns should be required reading before anyone even thinks about calling themselves a J2EE Architect. I highly recommend it.
The other book I highly recommend is Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture. It is probably the best book ever written on Enterprise Development. However, it is a bit over the top for the SCEA exam.
 
Anonymous
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Guys,
Thanks very much for you honest assessments. I've got Cade and the new Osborne guides. Am presently reading Osbourne. Also have GoF and Fowler.
Looking to buy (from Bookpool):
- Java Internationalization by Deitsch
(got doubts about its applicability)
- Java Message Service by Monson-Haefel
(excited about this one, want to learn JMS)
- Java Security 2nd Edition by Oaks (ditto)
- Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans, 2e by Roman
(seems like EVERYone likes this book)
I'll add Chris's recommendations as well. Even if some material extends beyond what's needed for the cert, the cert is, for me, a framework for learning this technology.
 
Anonymous
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Guys,
What are your specific thoughts on the i18n book? Is it needed for the exam? Must admit: I'm very stoked about digging into JMS and security, but much less so about I18N items.
 
Chris Mathews
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Originally posted by Erick Reid:
Looking to buy (from Bookpool):
- Java Internationalization by Deitsch
(got doubts about its applicability)
- Java Message Service by Monson-Haefel
(excited about this one, want to learn JMS)
- Java Security 2nd Edition by Oaks (ditto)
- Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans, 2e by Roman
(seems like EVERYone likes this book)

The Internationalization book is not necessary. This topic does not have heavy converage on the exam and the online resources that are available will more than suffice.
The same goes for Security. I don't think a separate book is necessary for a topic that most people only receive two questions on. Check for online resources...
Java Message Service is great for learning JMS, however it is not strictly necessary for the exam. Basically knowing the difference between Topics and Queues is all that is really needed for the exam. Regardless, I recommend you pick this book up just to learn JMS. It is a useful skillset to have when confronting real-world problems.
Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans (2nd Edition) is definitely a good book for learning EJB. I also recommend Enterprise JavaBeans (3rd Edition). I have both.
For learning general OOAD, I recommend Applying UML and Patterns. It is an excellent book and is definitely worth the investment.
Maybe I should just post the contents of my entire library... :roll:
[ June 03, 2003: Message edited by: Chris Mathews ]
 
Anonymous
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Chris,
Thanks once again for your feedback. My Bookpool shopping cart now shows:
- Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies by Alur (the newest version, not yet published)
- Enterprise JavaBeans, 3rd Edition by Monson-Haefel
- Java Message Service by Monson-Haefel
- Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans by Roman
- Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture by Fowler
I've got the older edition of Applying UML by Larson at home, and UML Distilled, and GoF*. Will have lots of homework in coming weeks! This cert will be a good hike.
*Was shocked to find my boss's name listed in the acknowledgements of GoF. He knows a wee bit more about enterprise development than I do.
 
Chris Mathews
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Originally posted by Erick Reid:

Thanks once again for your feedback. My Bookpool shopping cart now shows:
- Core J2EE Patterns: Best Practices and Design Strategies by Alur (the newest version, not yet published)
- Enterprise JavaBeans, 3rd Edition by Monson-Haefel
- Java Message Service by Monson-Haefel
- Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans by Roman
- Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture by Fowler

Looks like a good purchase... just a few additional notes.
1) You really only need one book on EJB for the exam. However, reading two separate books will give you a much better understanding. Ultimately that is your call.
2) Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans is available for free as a pdf here. Personally, I prefer to buy the actual books in addition to using the electronic copies as references.
3) When you become comfortable with EJB (and you should be after you read the above mentioned books) then I would recommend picking up a copy of EJB Design Patterns: Advanced Patterns, Processes, and Idioms. It is not as important as some of the other books mentioned, but it definitely offers some good insights.
 
Darryl A. J. Staflund
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Hi there,
The following was my booklist for Part I:
1. O'Reilly's Enterprise JavaBeans (Of course!)
2. O'Reilly's Java Security (Scot Oaks).
3. Mark Grand's first book on Design Patterns (Wiley).
The first two were essential reading for me. The third was good too but, boy!, does it get monotonous reading design patterns :-)
Because I had had taken IBM's UML course, I relied Craig Larman's book on applying UML and design patterns (2nd edition) to bone up on UML, the Unified Process, and architectural considerations. I found Martin Flower's book a good read but not all that relevant when it came to writing the exam.
Darryl
 
Anonymous
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Chris and Darryl,
Thanks for the insight and for helping to lend structure to my study plan. It's nice when the path becomes clearer.
Chris, your point #1 speaks to the need to hit the same topic from different angles to really dig into it. The first source introduces things and provides background knowledge, material from the second source then has something to stick to, and tends to really enlighten. This has been my experience even when reading the same source 2x.
I totally agree with point #2 -- I tried to save a buck with the PDF, but something gets lost when unable to highlight things, and unable to thumb back to some page to verify an earlier assertion.
Darryl, I'll probably hit the Larson book next. It was my intro to OO, given out as part of an instructor-led class, hot off the press (the 1st edition). Enjoyed the course enormously.
Thanks again guys!
 
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