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multiple passengers scenario

 
abd hassan
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Can a customer book a reservation for multiple passengers? I don't think the use cases mention this or am I missing something? Is this going to be an assumption that we make in the design? Would appreciate a response. Thanks.
 
Dhiren Joshi
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Can a customer book a reservation for multiple passengers? I don't think the use cases mention this or am I missing something? Is this going to be an assumption that we make in the design? Would appreciate a response. Thanks


Yes u can make it assumption if u want and then all your architecture need to stick with that. The use case doest mention it and if u like to keep it simple u may go with it as is.

HTH
Dhiren
 
Lucy Hummel
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I totally agree with Dhiren.

Lucy
 
I Roberts
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Hi,

I decided to keep it simple and only allowed the member to be a passenger. My main reasons behind this is that multiple passengers resulted in numerous assumptions to be made that would not normally be made without further consultation with the client. As this was not possible, I decided (rightly or wrongly) to assume on a solo-passenger could be booked and explained this within my assumptions.

Regards,
 
abd hassan
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Thanks. Yes I think that keeping things simple may be the way to go here.At least thats what I gather from the people who have already passed part2. Hopefully it'll work in my case ! Thanks again.
 
Terry McKee
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I agree that it is important to keep things simple, but I think it would be a mistake not to account for this scenario. Even though it is not explicitly in the requirements, I think it is safe to make some well-thought out assumptions concerning this (just document them). In the real world, a customer could simply be purchasing trips for other people. This happens all the time. I think that I am going to have something that encapsulates the person that makes the purchase and a separate something that encapsulates the person or pepole that actually fly.

One more thought, think about how frequent flyer programs work in the real world. Does each passenger get frequent flyer miles or does each customer? I believe it is the customer.
 
Sanly Fang
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I am always thinking of a simple solution because I am afraid complex/comprehensive design will add burden to the guy who assess my assignment, in addition, given so many assumptions and details, it's easy to let him/her misunderstand my ideas.

Most importantly, why we must complicate things if simple solution can gain high score? Anyway, it's an exam, why an architect should make so many assumptions on business requirements in reality?

Originally posted by Terry McKee:
I agree that it is important to keep things simple, but I think it would be a mistake not to account for this scenario. Even though it is not explicitly in the requirements, I think it is safe to make some well-thought out assumptions concerning this (just document them). In the real world, a customer could simply be purchasing trips for other people. This happens all the time. I think that I am going to have something that encapsulates the person that makes the purchase and a separate something that encapsulates the person or pepole that actually fly.

One more thought, think about how frequent flyer programs work in the real world. Does each passenger get frequent flyer miles or does each customer? I believe it is the customer.
 
Terry McKee
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I am not sure which way is more appropriate. I agree that complicating the project is not a good thing. I am just wondering if points will be taken away if we don't incorporate this scenario into the solution. I guess one thing that could be done to remove the likelyhood that points will be taken away is if you just identify this scenario in your assumptions. That way your design stays simple and the person that is assesing the project knows you are aware of this issue. At this point, I still don't know how I am going to handle this.

I wonder if this issue is like the 'issue' many people had when studying for the Developer certification: Should I use ISO-8859-1 or UTF-8 for the encoding. In the end, it didn't matter which way you chose. Looking back it was a non-issue.

Does anyone else have any thoughts?
 
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