• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Ron McLeod
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Liutauras Vilda
Sheriffs:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Henry Wong
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Jj Roberts
  • Tim Holloway
  • Piet Souris
Bartenders:
  • Himai Minh
  • Carey Brown
  • salvin francis

Action classes in component diagram

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 156
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi everyone,

I am creating my component diagrams, and i have used the Front Controller design pattern. My question is this: Should I use some action classes after the Front Controller ?

I think that for a complete design of this pattern, i agree with the fact that the controller does not execute any business rule or call any business object. It just delegate this to a action class (And it is a Command pattern).

But, in the other hand, i see that insert this classes in the component diagam, will over glutter it, since there will be to many actions for a single use case, or boundaire.

Could someone help me fix this doubt ?

Att,

Ricardo Ferreira - Brazil
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello Ricardo! :-)

My advice is to follow your instincts and keep the good sense. If you think it�d be better to hide some components in order to keep your model simpler, that�s no problem as long as you document it. Following this rule, you can keep things clean and simple, but always writing down some comments about it using UML�s notes.

take care and good luck,

Fred
 
Ricardo Ferreira
Ranch Hand
Posts: 156
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello my friend, that a good thing to know that you're here.

Thanks a lot Fred, I'll follow your advice and try to keep my diagram simplier but reasonable to the evaluator. Some tip from a good experienced person is the better thing that i could get.

See you

Att

Ricardo Ferreira - Brazil

Originally posted by Frederico Melo:
Hello Ricardo! :-)

My advice is to follow your instincts and keep the good sense. If you think it�d be better to hide some components in order to keep your model simpler, that�s no problem as long as you document it. Following this rule, you can keep things clean and simple, but always writing down some comments about it using UML�s notes.

take care and good luck,

Fred

 
Sheriff
Posts: 5782
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There are many ways to do it, so I don't have "one right answer".

I'd just like to echo the good advice - keep it simple, readable but complete. Not everything need to appear on the sequence diagram. But at the same time, it should not have gaping holes.

When you need to express more, but are afraid of complexity and size, use creative methods such as stereotypes and anchored notes. And as I have recommended here before, when you're finished, have it peer reviewed by someone who understands UML and Java. Your goal - anyone looking at your diagrams should understand most of it, if not all.
 
I hired a bunch of ninjas. The fridge is empty, but I can't find them to tell them the mission.
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic