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Passed part 2 with 78%

 
Henrique Ordine
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My score was a bit disappointing but still, maybe there�s something to be learned from this.
Here�s the result:
Class Diagrams ����36/44;
Component Diagrams �..30/44;
Sequence Diagrams��..12/12;
My sequence diagrams were really detailed. I had conditions, loops, transaction demarcation, notes, and references to other diagrams. One thing they probably liked was that I drew System Sequence Diagrams for each use case that required more than one interaction between the user and the system to complete, and for each of those interactions I had a separate Sequence Diagram.
I drew 2 class diagrams, one for the domain classes and one for the EJBs. The former did not include any business service classes and included about 20 classes with all kinds of relationships: aggregation, composition, association, inheritance and dependency, all with multiplicities. It also had role names and constraints. I didn�t include every single attribute but I included some, which I thought would help in understanding the system. In short, this diagram was very detailed and I worked on it for ages and thought I had made sure every requirement had been met. The EJB class diagram was also just as detailed and I had about 35 classes in it.
Because my architecture had too many components (about 100) to place in only one diagram, I drew one for each module. I hadn�t had any experience with component diagrams before so I probably included more components than I should have, since all other posts I�ve read in this forum says they had about 30 to 40 components. Oh, and I only included interfaces for a few components even though most of the communication between components was made via interfaces.
I spent about six months on these diagrams, but that�s because it didn�t feel right to be SCEA without any knowledge of JAAS and JCA, so I spent some time learning those. Oh, and here is the list of resources I used:
�Applying UML and Patterns 3rd edition;
�Design Patterns � Element of Reusable Object-Oriented Software;
�This forum (thanks guys);
�Designing Enterprise Applications with J2EE platform, 2nd edition;
�Many articles from theserverside.com and javaworld.com;
�JAAS and JCA specifications;
�Fowler�s UML Distilled, 3rd edition;
�EPracticeLabs� SCEA part 2 and 3 simulator; (Their diagrams were much, much simpler than mine);
�Freud�s The Interpretation of Dreams; (I actually dreamt of these diagrams);
So, my opinion is: don�t read too much about it, just draw it. If you don�t feel you�re solution is right, trust your feelings. Implement it and test it. Also, make sure you read the requirements over and over and, it�s also a good idea to have a good reason for drawing each element on your diagrams. A good reason is usually one to do with meeting those requirements.
 
Hong Anderson
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Congrats
Thanks for suggestions.
 
Patrick Williams
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That's still a pretty good score. Congrats!
 
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