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UML stereotypes

 
Leszek Sliwko
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Hello,


I tried to find something about UML stereotypes form Sun, however everything I've found is this page:
http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2EE/patterns/UseOfUML.html

And now my question - the SessionEJB does no specify if bean is statefull or stateless. How can I mark that on my diagram?

The same goes for EntityEJB - how can I mark it as CMP or BMP?

Thanks
 
Ronald Wouters
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maybe the following link is of some help :

EJB components to UML elements mapping

Regards
 
Juan Pablo Crossley
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I used to put <<Stateless>>, <<Stateful>> to the session beans or <<Entity Bean>>, I usually don't specify if its a EJB 3.0 or 2.1 that will clutter the diagram and will not add any new information about it.

I don't put the Home, Remote and creation objects (like InitialContext) in the diagrams, if you do that your diagram will be 30% bigger and will confuse your developers, they know how to create that kind of components unless you are creating a framework components like a ServiceLocator Cache which will have a special implementation.

if you want to go to a higher level of detail then you will put that, for example if your developers are not well experienced with the EJB behavior.
 
Ådne Brunborg
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Stereotypes are always a tricky issue, as clear and concise guidelines are hard to find... in strick UML, is <<stateless session bean>> a stereotype? I don't know.

Use stereotypes to add value to your diagram. These are some of the stereotypes I used in the class diagram for my SCEA-assignment:

<<stateless session bean>>
<<stateful session bean>>
<<message>>
<<message-driven bean>>
<<abstract factory>>
<<factory method>>
<<singleton>>
<<managed bean>>
<<business delegate>>
<<JSF>>

Now, I did not get a full score on my class diagram, I scored 37 or 38 out of 44. It might be that this is partially due to the stereotype-usage - I don't know. But in RL, I find that most developers find using design patterns as stereotypes to be very helpful.
[ January 22, 2008: Message edited by: �dne Brunborg ]
 
Leszek Sliwko
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Thanks guys!

I guess if it's not so clear for current SCEAs, then Sun also won't be so picky.
 
Patrick Williams
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Or it might be what we lost points on.

Sorry, I shouldn't try and scare you like that.
 
Leszek Sliwko
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I have bought a assigment already - too late to be scared ;-)
Anyway - I spend more time drawing uml than designing a system :-)

Can you point to some uml-perfect example uml diagrams for comparsion?

I have a Distilled UML, Cade and other books, but those are not 'how-to-draw-perfect-uml-fot-dummies-and-even-more-stupid-dummies' books.

Something useful for anyone reading this - simple and stupid - just type "uml j2ee" in Google Images...
[ January 29, 2008: Message edited by: Leszek Sliwko ]
 
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