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I made it !

 
Java geezer
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Phew ! Definitely much harder than I could have possibly imagined. Sun have really ensured that standards remain high (no MCSE style here).
If not for my recent experience with Servlets and JSP (using the mighty Forte/Netbeans), I would have failed. Cramming the specs does not even guarantee a pass.
But have no fear. Here are my suggestions.
If you use JSP/Servlets at work
1. Install Tomcat 4.0
2. Development environment must be forte (the auto-completion features of Forte saved me - it made me more curious each time I programmed JSP pages as I always digged deep to find out what each method did and gave me a sense of what the attribuites were).
3. Don't read too many textbooks. If you have been working with JSP before just check out the specs and summarise with ken and carl's solid guide.
4. You've got to know your taglibs. Lay emphasis here.
5. Lay emphasis on syntax syntax syntax... !
6. Round up by reading up on design patterns and understanding it. I read but cant say I understood... should have tried harder.
7. Finally dont be over-confident. The mechanism involved in servlet/jsp is very subtle ... just when you think you've got it, you probabaly haven't.
8. Go kick some ass ....
9. Have a COKE and a SMILE .. you are now SCWCD!

Now if you've never done JSP/SERVLET but is SCJP certified (pre-requisite).
1. Buy Core Servlets and JSP by Marty Hall (I have not read Jason Hunter's book, but I prefer the tutorial nature of this book)
2. Pick a project. Ironically your project should be based on an Exam (not necessarily Java could be any subject - like a movie quiz). Applying a quiz/test application scenario will allow you to explore most of the day to day issues that JSP developers face.
3. Be confident and dont fear. If you could do SCJP ... you can do this (but be warned, you may find this harder than SCJP like I did).
Repeat steps 1 - 9 above...
Good Luck RANCHERS !
ps
Oh, By the Way I scored 91% (Glory be to the most high GOD !)
 
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Oh, I forgot to add. For those wishing to develop a JSP quiz/exam application. The application should be secure.
I forgot to mention that Forte also features an internal tomcat engine. So you dont have to install a new instance. Even if you decide to use tomcat 4.0 from within Forte, you can sure configure Forte to do so.
Another cool feature of Forte is its compilation/debugging functionality. This helped me a lot on the syntax side of things. Whats more, its superb XML validation ensures that your web.xml and server.xml can be validated. It also presents these files in a tree like manner where each element is a changeable node. Also the element of the web_app2.3.dtd can be browsed. This helped me solidify knowledge of the elements/tags - this came up a lot in the exam.
Phew,,, its very hot down here in London.. its a bank holiday and we have the Carnival on Monday .. I intend to Rock...
Any other ranchers need help, I am ever willing to help (I wont tell any questions just hints
Take care guys !
 
Swami nathan
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Congratulations Franklin and thanks for the excellent suggestions!
cheers!
 
ruijin yang
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Franklin Nwankwo:
Congratulation!You cartainly can enjoy the Carnival on Monday.
Do you mean that the development environment(tools) for JSP/Servlet is important for passing this exam?So I should go to download Forte/Netbeans now.

Cheers!
----------------
ruijin yang
SCJP2

[This message has been edited by ruijin yang (edited August 24, 2001).]
[This message has been edited by ruijin yang (edited August 26, 2001).]
 
Rishi Singh
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Dear Franklin,
hearty congrats!!! would u please clarify the following aspects.
How to use Forte/Netbeans ,how far it is helpful.what was the distribution of the questions,how many questions from jsp,what were the other resources,how do u ascertain yourself that u r capable of going for the exam,is remembering the specs a must,r the questions more of code based snippets,or one/two lines of code checking syntax and other objectives.
thankx
Rishi
 
Tony Alicea
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Franklin:
"Oh, I forgot to add. For those wishing to develop a JSP quiz/exam application. The application should be secure."
That was in relation to the Certification test.
Although I have professional experience in Servlets and JSPs, I have never had to develop a secure application.
I am studying slowly for this Certification and I am in the middle of the security theme.
I have learned to use the following element (and its sub-elements) in web.xml:
<security-constraints> and its children <web-resource-collection>, <auth-constraint> and <user-data-constraint>.
I already known the 4 authorization mechanisms (BASIC, FORM, DIGEST and the SSL one). Would that be enough to get 100% in that area in the test?
Thanks (and please see my other question regarding NetBeans' IDE).

 
Tony Alicea
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Franklin:
"Whats more, its superb XML validation ensures that your web.xml and
server.xml can be validated. It also presents these files in a tree like manner where each
element is a changeable node."

I have been using NetBeans at work recently after a long affair with IBM's Vusal Age (and Studio).
The web.xml or server.xml or any other XML file that I open in NetBeans, opens up in a text editor, not like in a tree-like manner.
How do you get it to do that?
Thanks.

 
Tariq Dweik
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Congrats Franklin
can u till the following :
1. which section was with the most Q's
2. No. of Q's per each section.
3. Was there any "What is the method ..." for JSP API ??
Thanks in advance
 
Java geezer
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Hi Tony,

I started out using NetBeans and experienced the same problems. I then moved to Forte. NetBeans is cool in that its open source but unfortunately, it does not seem to provide a mechanism for downloading compatible Forte modules (AFAIK the XML modules are in Forte). After trying to make loads of things work in Netbeans, I threw off my OSS cap and went with Forte (an excellent Netbeans derivative). The thing I like most with Forte is that you get the best of both worlds (Netbeans modules and extensive Forte modules).
When you install forte ensure that you visit the Update center to download the modules you may need...
So my advice is: move to Forte CE v4. You think Netbeans is cool ? Wait till you use Forte. Forte features excellent Database schema (O/R mapping) to java class mapping, auto java code update, Teamware integration, JNDI lookup config.... excellent HTML, JAVA, XML and JSP editior, J2EE RI/iPlanet integration plus many more !

Damn I reckon its the best IDE ever made ! Yes and that includes Visual Studio (or whatever that nonesense is called .
Good luck Sherrif !
Originally posted by Tony Alicea:
Franklin:
"Whats more, its superb XML validation ensures that your web.xml and
server.xml can be validated. It also presents these files in a tree like manner where each
element is a changeable node."

I have been using NetBeans at work recently after a long affair with IBM's Vusal Age (and Studio).
The web.xml or server.xml or any other XML file that I open in NetBeans, opens up in a text editor, not like in a tree-like manner.
How do you get it to do that?
Thanks.

 
Java geezer
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Just read Carl and Ken's note on this area (Security) ... its more than enough. The thing with this exam is that its not just about cramming up elements and method names ... if you have not practiced your JSP and Servlets .. Sun will surely catch you. You have to know the syntax.... its not as hard as SCJP2 but it would seem so if you underestimate it. Remember we dont have any cert books to read for this so it does seem harder than SCJP2 in that sense.. you've got to know your stuff ..
Thanks
Originally posted by Tony Alicea:
Franklin:
"Oh, I forgot to add. For those wishing to develop a JSP quiz/exam application. The application should be secure."
That was in relation to the Certification test.
Although I have professional experience in Servlets and JSPs, I have never had to develop a [b]secure
application.
I am studying slowly for this Certification and I am in the middle of the security theme.
I have learned to use the following element (and its sub-elements) in web.xml:
<security-constraints> and its children <web-resource-collection>, <auth-constraint> and <user-data-constraint>.
I already known the 4 authorization mechanisms (BASIC, FORM, DIGEST and the SSL one). Would that be enough to get 100% in that area in the test?
Thanks (and please see my other question regarding NetBeans' IDE).
[/B]

 
krishna anand
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Dear Franklin
Congrats on passing SCWCD Exam .
Wishing you all the best in your career.

------------------
Krishna
[This message has been edited by krishna anand (edited August 27, 2001).]
 
Arun, Shanmugham
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Hi Franklin,
Thats Great!. All the best for your future career.
Arun
 
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