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Resource in DTD

 
Mark Spritzler
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I keep getting confused as to what is the difference between resource-env-ref, resource-ref, and env-entry.
If I think logically I figure one must be a reference to an Environment variable already in the JNDI tree, one must put one into the JNDI Tree, and one must be an object in the JNDI tree, not in the environment side of it. But even if I am right, which one relates to which?
Thanks
Mark
 
Mark Spritzler
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Axel Janssen
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Here some text from http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Servlets/servletapi2.3/

The Servlet API 2.3 is slated to become a core part of Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition 1.3 (J2EE 1.3). The previous version, Servlet API 2.2, was part of J2EE 1.2. The only noticeable difference is the addition of a few relatively obscure J2EE-related deployment descriptor tags in the web.xml DTD: <resource-env-ref> to support "administered objects," such as those required by the Java Messaging System (JMS); <res-ref-sharing-scope> to allow either shared or exclusive access to a resource reference; and <run-as> to specify the security identity of a caller to an EJB. Most servlet authors need not concern themselves with those J2EE tags; you can get a full description from the J2EE 1.3 specification.

But don't ask me now what administered objects are about.
Axel
 
Madhav Lakkapragada
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relatively obscure.......
- satya
 
Mark Spritzler
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But don't ask me now what administered objects are about.

Now why would I do that.
These sound like things you put into the JNDI tree to support EJB objects. I have done that.
Mark
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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