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Why is SCWCD a J2EE certification?

 
Anton Hinds
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Hello!
I looked in the faq but could not find the answer to this question. I appologise if this has been asked before.
The technologies covered by the SCWCD (servlets, JSP, HTTP) do not require the J2EE runtime. Why is the SCWCD considered J2EE? Where is the dividing line?
 
Theodore Casser
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I would think that the dividing line is a matter of which APIs are part of J2SE and which are part of J2EE.
In this case, servlets and JSPs are part of the J2EE SDK, hence their inclusion as a J2EE exam. Were this to change (ie, servlets and JSPs move into the J2SE SDK for 1.6 (not that it's going to happen)), I imagine the exam would need to be moved.
 
Hai Peng Zhou
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1. J2EE includes two parts: web and applicaton,if you download
from matirial from SUN. you see the two parts: j2sdkee1.3.1,
jwsdp-1.3.
2. J2EE is stand and not like J2SE which is fulfilled by
SUN officially , every one can fulfill it and every product
has its own bin directory and "statup". When you develop
your sevelet, you won't find servlet.jar in SUN's
j2sdk1.4.0_01, but in jakarta-tomcat-4.1.7\common\lib\servlet.jar
 
Theodore Casser
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Originally posted by Hai Peng Zhou:
1. J2EE includes two parts: web and applicaton,if you download
from matirial from SUN. you see the two parts: j2sdkee1.3.1,
jwsdp-1.3.

I'm fairly certain, Hai, that you're confusing Java Web Services (jwsdp) with the J2EE web-component stuff, since the servlet and JSP technology comes in the j2sdkee1.3.1. But you are right that the web and business components are two different matters, IIRC.
[ April 19, 2004: Message edited by: Theodore Casser ]
 
Nicholas Cheung
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You can see why SCWCD is part of J2EE from the specification.
In J2EE 1.3, JSP 1.2 and Servlet 2.0 are included. In J2EE 1.4, JSP 2.0 and Servlet 2.4 are included.
Thus, you can conclude that JSP, Servlets, as well as EJB are part of J2EE.
You never see J2SE 1.4 included these specifications, as well as their APIs.
In addition, you may further ask why J2EE included JSP but not J2SE, I think only the specification development team can answer this question, just like you are asking why 1+1=2.
But, as J2EE focus on Enterprise (or Distributed) systems, the connectivity issues surely included in it, and thus, Web Components must be part of it. You dont need any Web Components in standalone applications, unless you try to make one for the purpose of convenience.
Nick
 
Nathaniel Stoddard
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It doesn't look like anybody mentioned this, but on the J2EE webpage there's actually a section at the bottom that has links to each of the individual specifications that is under the J2EE umbrella. Here's the link. As for packaging things with J2SE instead of J2EE, remember that some technologies are part of both. Take JDBC for instance. It's officially a J2EE technology, but it is packaged with J2SE now.
 
Nicholas Cheung
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It is difficult to say. In the old days, J2SE only serve the core Java library. Most of other packages are optional. Like JDBC, JCE, etc.
However, SUN tries to adopt more and more packages, and provide a good packaging with Java library, and thus, performing some merge, like JDBC and JCE put into J2SE 1.4, etc.
In fact, it is not that easy to change a package, as well know. Just like what we wanna change some source codes in production is not straight forward. We need lots of approval from top management, and we need more and more tests before changes. Thus, I think SUN has really realize the needs of change and make them accordingly.
Nick
 
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