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length of time

 
Paul Keohan
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I know this is a very subjective question but can anyone give a reasonable indication of how long it takes to do the developer exam. I passed the programmer certification last year and I'd like to get the developer certification by April of this year. Am I being overly optimistic? I have a full time job which takes up all Monday to Friday so would five or six weekends be enough for the average man?
Thanks for any advice.
Paul
 
Sam Wong
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I've heard anything from 40 - 80 hours. I don't know if that's just design/implementation/testing or all the reading that's done before a person even starts thinking about design. Personally, I've put over 80 hours already into it. This includes reading RHE a couple of times, RMI, etc. I'm about half way through development. Haven't worked on it for awhile being too busy at work and school.
This probably didn't help much, did it?
 
Matt DeLacey
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I've actually heard anywhere from 40 - 120 hours. I think there are so many variables, but if you are willing to spend a significant amount of time on weekends, I think your goal is very doable! Go for it. Seems to me, the worst that can happen is that you are a couple of weeks behind goal, or maybe you don't even get it finished, but trust me, you will learn A LOT and it will be worth your time and money even if you don't hit your goal.
With Respect,
Matt
 
Rudy Yeung
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I have a full time job myself, and is now working towards my SCJD. My plan is to spend three weeks (2 to 3 hr per day)working on each of this component: GUI, JDBC, networking, threadsafe feature. This makes up a total of 12wees plus 20% contingency that will be 14.4 weeks, i.e. 3.5 months.
 
Adrian Yan
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I personally don't have a set time frame . I just want to take my sweet old time to learn as much as I can. From my progress sso far, I think 120 hours should be sufficient.
As for me, instead of going to a chapter of a book to learn JTable, or RMI, or thread, I pruchased seperate books on each of the subjects, and read them from page 1.
I know some of you might not agree with me, but I think this way, I can get more out of this project.
 
Henry Zhang
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Dear Adrian-
It seems that I got a similar assignment as yours. It involved
a Flying Booking system which should work locally and remotely.
I was mandatorilly required to use either serialized socket connection or RMI. I decided to use RMI which I never know. And
also must use Swing components(JTable) to build the GUI.
I wonder what books you are reading? And what is your recommendation? I want to know every unfamiliar concept before I start the design.
As for the design, did you use any particular method like UML?
There is another track to get Java developer certification. See my post about that topic Here or you visit www.jcert.com .
Thanks for your reply in advance.
 
Matt DeLacey
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Rudy--it will take you even shorter than you think! JDBC is not covered on the Developer's Exam. It uses a flat file database.
Happy birthday.

With Respect,
Matt
 
Adrian Yan
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Matt is right, Rudy. It shouldn't take you that long.
Henry, I have Java Thread Programming by Paul Hyde (SAMS), Definitive Guide to Swing 2 for Java 2 by John Zukowski (APress), Java Network Programming by Elliotte Rusty Harold (OReilly), and of course, Thinking In Java 2nd Edition by Bruce Eckel (a must).
I'm 3/4 through Java Thread Programming, it has lots code , which I like. It seems very decent book, the other book I might get is Java Thread by Oreilly.
Java Network Programming is also a good book, it's kind of slow, but it definitely teaches alot of network programming, one problem is that it doesn't cover RMI enough. I'll probably get Java Distributed Programming by OReilly or Manning.
Thinking In Java is definitely a must, I don't think I need to write much about it.
The Definitive Guide to Swing, I havn't really got into yet, I did found couple of errors, and the publisher says that they will post them.
 
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