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Architecture requirements  RSS feed

 
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I'm having trouble interpreting what Sun is requiring regarding the section "Overall Architecture" for the Flight Scheduling
assignment.
It indicates a "traditional client-server system" with network server functionality. Fine, I plan on using RMI.
It further requires that the program must be able to work in a non-networked mode, stating "the database and user interface run in the same VM and no networking is performed, and no sockets should be created".
The last part is what confuses me. How do you have a client-server relationship without use of Sockets? I've looked at several different
sources and there's always somekind of socket-type connection being made between the client and server.
What exactly am I missing?

Thanks in advance....
 
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It further requires that the program must be able to work in a non-networked mode, stating "the database and user interface run in the same VM and no networking is performed, and no sockets should be created".
The last part is what confuses me. How do you have a client-server relationship without use of Sockets?


In non-networked mode, there is no server, and therefore no client-server relationship. You just have a client that connects to local database directly.
Eugene.
 
Duane Riech
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So, in simple language, there is only one user
who can run the program at one time, a.k.a. a
standard, plain old, java application?
Also, in local mode no RMI classes would be used,
right???
 
John Smith
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So, in simple language, [in local mode -- my insert] there is only one user
who can run the program at one time, a.k.a. a
standard, plain old, java application?
Also, in local mode no RMI classes would be used,
right???


You got it.
Eugene.
[ February 27, 2003: Message edited by: Eugene Kononov ]
 
town drunk
( and author)
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The point here is the Sun doesn't want you to write an application that uses sockets in local mode. It shouldn't have to be stated, but there you go.
M
 
Greenhorn
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Also, it says "the program must allow the user to specify the location of the database"
How come a client user to specify the location of backend database. Anyway, we just have one databse db.db, does the user has any choice?
 
John Smith
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How come a client user to specify the location of backend database. Anyway, we just have one databse db.db, does the user has any choice?


My interpretation of this requirement is that the user should be able to specify the location of the database in local mode only. However, some other people here disagree.
Eugene.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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